Psycho-Babble Faith Thread 436799

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Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or ayrity

Posted by Angel Girl on January 10, 2005, at 4:29:49

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 5, 2005, at 0:46:34

ayrity

Thank you for replying my questions. Now, your replies bring forth more questions. I would like to repeat, that I am not here to debate Christianity vs the Jewish faith, but to attempt to understand the difference.

1. You say that you believe in Heaven but not Hell. Is it the Jewish belief that all Jews will go to Heaven?

2. You say that you use basically the same Old Testament, but do not include "apocryphal texts". Can you please explain what *apocryphal texts* means? (Something tells me I'm going to be very embarrassed to hear the answer to this question).

3. With your Bible being in Hebrew, and I think I understand your sermons to be in Hebrew as well, does this mean that all Jewish people speak and understand the Hebrew language? I'm referring partially about Jewish families that have settled here and have children born in this country. Are they taught Hebrew? And what about those who convert from another faith to that of the Jewish faith? Are they taught Hebrew? If not, I wonder how they are to get much from the religious ceremony or the Bible used?

4. If apocryphal texts can be considered Jewish texts, why would they not be considered part of the Jewish canon?

5. Why is Jesus Christ not believed to be the Messiah?

6. If you do not believe in evil and that Satan does not act outside the will of God, then how do you account for the bad things that happen ie: murders, etc. Are they the will of God? What purpose could they serve?

I hope that you or someone else of knowledge is willing to reply these questions.

Thanks once again for your very informative answers.

AG


 

Re: The Jewish Faith? Angel Girl

Posted by MKB on January 10, 2005, at 4:49:33

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? MKB, posted by Angel Girl on January 10, 2005, at 3:58:34

Rabbinic means they were written by rabbis. These writings were like commentaries on how Jews should live.

I'll try to answer in general terms off the top of my head, though I know more detail is required: The Jewish people of Israel/Judah were attacked and carried into captivity several times and their temple was destroyed. Without their temple and/or living in a foreign land, it was impossible to carry out the animal sacrifices required by Moses's Law. Much of the Old Testament is devoted to the prophets warning the Jews that this would happen. The rabbis wrote in an attempt to keep the Jewish faith alive despite not having a Temple. This happened over a period of several hundred years before and after Christ. It was during this time that synagogues developed, where Jewish people would gather to worship and study.

There were several temples beginning with Solomon's Temple and ending with Herod's Temple, all on basically the same spot, the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Each temple was destroyed by enemies of the Jewish people, ending with Herod's Temple, which was destroyed by the Romans in 70 A.D. The fact that the Muslims later built a mosque on that same spot is one of the the main reasons for the Jewish-Muslim conflict. This is a very general answer, which I hope will serve as a lauching pad for further study.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or Angel Girl

Posted by MKB on January 10, 2005, at 4:57:28

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or ayrity, posted by Angel Girl on January 10, 2005, at 4:29:49

The apocryphal texts referred to are Jewish writings that Roman Catholics include in their Bible, but which are not considered scripture by either Jews or Protestants. They can be useful and interesting, but they were not accepted by the Jews as authoritative. Protestants accept the same books that the Jews do in the Old Testament canon.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? MKB

Posted by Angel Girl on January 11, 2005, at 1:06:27

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? Angel Girl, posted by MKB on January 10, 2005, at 4:49:33

Thank you for your answers. I am embarrassed at what little I know of The Bible. <hangs head in shame>

So, why did the Jewish people have so many enemies? What had they done, if anything, to cause this? What country was this in?

If the Jewish temples were being destroyed, why not the Muslim mosques?

I can see why the Jews would be angry that the Muslim mosques were not also destroyed.

I guess you can see how very little I know. This is very much like a history lesson in addition to learning about different faiths.

AG

> Rabbinic means they were written by rabbis. These writings were like commentaries on how Jews should live.
>
> I'll try to answer in general terms off the top of my head, though I know more detail is required: The Jewish people of Israel/Judah were attacked and carried into captivity several times and their temple was destroyed. Without their temple and/or living in a foreign land, it was impossible to carry out the animal sacrifices required by Moses's Law. Much of the Old Testament is devoted to the prophets warning the Jews that this would happen. The rabbis wrote in an attempt to keep the Jewish faith alive despite not having a Temple. This happened over a period of several hundred years before and after Christ. It was during this time that synagogues developed, where Jewish people would gather to worship and study.
>
> There were several temples beginning with Solomon's Temple and ending with Herod's Temple, all on basically the same spot, the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. Each temple was destroyed by enemies of the Jewish people, ending with Herod's Temple, which was destroyed by the Romans in 70 A.D. The fact that the Muslims later built a mosque on that same spot is one of the the main reasons for the Jewish-Muslim conflict. This is a very general answer, which I hope will serve as a lauching pad for further study.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or MKB

Posted by Angel Girl on January 11, 2005, at 1:12:11

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or Angel Girl, posted by MKB on January 10, 2005, at 4:57:28

Thank you again for your reply.

Why would the Roman Catholics accept the apocryphal texts into canon when both the Jews and Protesants thought them to not be authoritive? And why were they not considered authoritive?

BTW, how do you know all this stuff?

AG

> The apocryphal texts referred to are Jewish writings that Roman Catholics include in their Bible, but which are not considered scripture by either Jews or Protestants. They can be useful and interesting, but they were not accepted by the Jews as authoritative. Protestants accept the same books that the Jews do in the Old Testament canon.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or

Posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:29:54

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or ayrity, posted by Angel Girl on January 10, 2005, at 4:29:49

Well, as I said, I'm highly unqualified to answer your questions, but I'll do the best I can. (See below):

> 1. You say that you believe in Heaven but not Hell. Is it the Jewish belief that all Jews will go to Heaven?

Again, Judaism is vague and not dogmatic about the afterlife, preferring to focus on the living rather than the dead. In general, it is the Jewish belief that EVERYONE who is repentent and has tried to live a just life has a share in the afterlife, not just Jews. This is where Judaism and Christianity difer. You do not have to be Jewish to achieve "salvation" or a share in the world to come. Please see this website for an excellent explanation; http://www.jewfaq.org/olamhaba.htm


> 2. You say that you use basically the same Old Testament, but do not include "apocryphal texts". Can you please explain what *apocryphal texts* means? (Something tells me I'm going to be very embarrassed to hear the answer to this question).

The apocrypha would include books such as Macabees, Tobit, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiaticus (not to be confused with Ecclesiastes), and many others. They were either considered to overlap with other texts or deemed not worthy for various reasons to be included in the Tanakh (Jewish Bible). However, many are still used (Macabees, for example, which gives us the Chanukah story); they are just not deemed to be on the same level as other texts.

> 3. With your Bible being in Hebrew, and I think I understand your sermons to be in Hebrew as well, does this mean that all Jewish people speak and understand the Hebrew language? I'm referring partially about Jewish families that have settled here and have children born in this country. Are they taught Hebrew? And what about those who convert from another faith to that of the Jewish faith? Are they taught Hebrew? If not, I wonder how they are to get much from the religious ceremony or the Bible used?

Sermons, even for the Orthdox, are not usually in Hebrew but in the vernacular language (English, etc.). This is for the benefit of those who do not understand enough Hebrew to follow. The prayer service in Conservative and Orthodox congregations is conducted in Hebrew; it would be dificult for someone unfamilar with Hebrew or the prayers to follow along, although many prayerbooks have English translations and the Rabbi usually announces where everyone is in the reading from time to time for those having trouble keeping up. Reform services are generally in English with more or less Hebrew depending on the location. Most Jews learn at least some degree of Hebrew as part of their religious education; this involves learning to read the prayer book and a basic understanding of the important prayers in Hebrew. However, not all Jews (including myself) are conversant in Hebrew. As far as conversion- I think that the person converting generally would be required to have a basic knowledge of Hebrew (alphabet, basic prayers) but not necessarily be able to speak the language.

> 4. If apocryphal texts can be considered Jewish texts, why would they not be considered part of the Jewish canon?

See my comments above. Some are still studied for their insights and historical content, but are considered lessor texts for many reasons.

> 5. Why is Jesus Christ not believed to be the Messiah?

For the very fact that everthing that is supposed to have happened when the Messiah comes did not happen- Jews are still scattered around the world, the Temple has not been rebuilt, the dead have not been resurrected, the world is not at peace, etc. All of these things are supposed to happen when the Messiah comes, and have not yet occurred, therefore Jesus could not have been the Messiah according to Jewish belief.
Again, see http://www.jewfaq.org/moshiach.htm for an excellent discussion.


> 6. If you do not believe in evil and that Satan does not act outside the will of God, then how do you account for the bad things that happen ie: murders, etc. Are they the will of God? What purpose could they serve?

Judaism doesn't offer simple explanations about good and evil. Jews believe that G-d is all powerful and all encompassing- the notion of bad things happening outside the will of G-d is simply not compatible with Jewish thought. And, the notion of a Satan who is the embodiment of evil and acts indepently from G-d is not compatible with Judaism's strict definition of monotheism. Basically, we can't understand G-d's reasons for everything, though we can question him (a cherished and basic Jewish notion). We can't always understand why bad things happen- it is the will of G-d for reasons we cannot always fathom.

> Thanks once again for your very informative answers.

My pleasure. Check out the website I mentioned above, http://www.jewfaq.org/index.htm. Many excellent answers to be found there.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:42:53

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? MKB, posted by Angel Girl on January 10, 2005, at 3:58:34

> >
> > One of the main things you need to know about Judaism is that they use rabbinic writings contained in the Talmud, in addition to the Old Testament. The Talmud is not part of the Bible.-----------------------------------------------> What are "rabbinic writings contained in the Talmud"? I apologize for my ignorance in the subject. I know extremely little of the Jewish faith.
> AG

MKB's description of the Talmud is limited and reflects the usual Christian misunderstandings of what the Talmud is. The Talmud is a vast compendium of knowledge and commentary, not just a legalistic document. Jews believe that the Oral Tradition contained in the Talmud was handed down at the same time as the Written Torah (or 5 books of Moses). It was transmitted from generation to generation until compiled and written down in the Mishnah. Sages then added their own commentary and interpretations (Gemarah). The Talmud consists of all of these parts. See http://www.jewfaq.org/torah.htm#Talmud for a nice explanation.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or ayrity

Posted by Angel Girl on January 11, 2005, at 13:22:55

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or, posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:29:54

ayrity

Thank you for your patience and time in replying my questions. I will look up the references that you have given me.

AG

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? ayrity

Posted by Angel Girl on January 11, 2005, at 13:24:53

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:42:53

ayrity

Thank you for lending further clarification to my question.

AG


> > >
> > > One of the main things you need to know about Judaism is that they use rabbinic writings contained in the Talmud, in addition to the Old Testament. The Talmud is not part of the Bible.-----------------------------------------------> What are "rabbinic writings contained in the Talmud"? I apologize for my ignorance in the subject. I know extremely little of the Jewish faith.
> > AG
>
> MKB's description of the Talmud is limited and reflects the usual Christian misunderstandings of what the Talmud is. The Talmud is a vast compendium of knowledge and commentary, not just a legalistic document. Jews believe that the Oral Tradition contained in the Talmud was handed down at the same time as the Written Torah (or 5 books of Moses). It was transmitted from generation to generation until compiled and written down in the Mishnah. Sages then added their own commentary and interpretations (Gemarah). The Talmud consists of all of these parts. See http://www.jewfaq.org/torah.htm#Talmud for a nice explanation.
>
>

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? ayrity

Posted by judy1 on January 11, 2005, at 17:47:34

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:42:53

what an awesome site- thank you so much for posting it. actually I was interested in reading about Kabbala, since that has become somewhat 'trendy' in my neck of the woods (so. cal). obviously, the followers I know couldn't possibly understand the intricacies of this since they haven't been studying for the decades (the site said one should be 40 years old to start studying) that seem to be necessary.
take care, judy

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 22:24:48

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? ayrity, posted by judy1 on January 11, 2005, at 17:47:34

> what an awesome site- thank you so much for posting it. actually I was interested in reading about Kabbala, since that has become somewhat 'trendy' in my neck of the woods (so. cal). obviously, the followers I know couldn't possibly understand the intricacies of this since they haven't been studying for the decades (the site said one should be 40 years old to start studying) that seem to be necessary.
> take care, judy

You're welcome. It is nice to have a positive thread about Judaism and answer genuine questions and curiosity in a supportive environment.

The current Kabbala fad has no resemblence to the actual Kabbala of Judaism, as you read on the website. It really is New Age philosophy repackaged. Of course, it might have value and meaning to those who pariticpate in it, but it is not to be confused with the Kabbala of traditional Judaism.

 

another question ayrity

Posted by judy1 on January 12, 2005, at 12:23:49

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 22:24:48

since you've been so gracious in your answers, I would like to take advantage :-) I've met Jesuits and rabbis who are true students of faith, and admire their commitment. You mentioned that to ask questions is a hallmark of the Jewish faith- is that akin to a crisis of faith (you can tell I have a Catholic background)? or is that more in the line of broadening one's knowledge? And is the study of the Talmud the most important aspect of understanding (that may have been on the site, sorry if I missed it)? and if it is, I imagine one must have a complete knowledge of Hebrew- would rabbis of all branches of Judaism (orthodox, conservative and reform) have this knowledge?
thanks again for your patience- judy

 

Re: another question

Posted by ayrity on January 12, 2005, at 23:21:33

In reply to another question ayrity, posted by judy1 on January 12, 2005, at 12:23:49

I'll break up your post and answer your questions below as best I can. Remember, I'm not a Jewish scholar and I do not have any advanced knowledge in these matters. I come from a Conservative Jewish background and typical after-school Hebrew school type education.

>You mentioned that to ask questions is a hallmark of the Jewish faith- is that akin to a crisis of faith (you can tell I have a Catholic background)? or is that more in the line of broadening one's knowledge?

Well it can be either, but the important thing is that questioning G-d does not necessarily mean one has lost faith. It means that one is trying to understand G-d better, and, in a way, hold G-d accountable to his obligations (covenant if you wiil) to mankind.


>And is the study of the Talmud the most important aspect of understanding (that may have been on the site, sorry if I missed it)?

Depends who you ask. Many authorities state that the Torah (the 5 Books of Moses) is the most important thing to study and all else is secondary. However, a good deal of emphasis and time is placed on learning Talmud, which is often necessary to amplify one's knowledge of the Torah- I think this varies from group to group (ie Hasidim vs Modern Orthodox, vs Consevative, etc.)

>....and if it is, I imagine one must have a complete knowledge of Hebrew- would rabbis of all branches of Judaism (orthodox, conservative and reform) have this knowledge?

The Talmud is available in English translation. However, much analysis of the Torah relies on the Hebrew language itself- its nuances, its numerical associations, etc. So any deep study of the Talmud or Torah would need to be in Hebrew, but for the average person English might be sufficient (an Orthodox Jew would likely disagree about that). Orthodox and Conservative Rabbis are fluent in Hebrew from my experience. I don't know about Reform Rabbis but I think they generally are, too.

> thanks again for your patience- judy

Sure thing! :-)

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by Wronged on January 13, 2005, at 5:45:39

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:42:53

I'm sure MKB knows that her knowledge of the Talmud is limited. Regardless of your belief that the Oral Law came down from Moses, it can still be argued that the Talmud is NOT in the Old Testament and is not the same thing. It's a matter of perspective, not fact.

MKB was trying to make the point that Jesus Christ criticized those Pharisees and rabbis who elevated tradition and oral law to an equivalence with Moses's Law. It's hard to see how someone who claims to be a Christian could ignore this part of the teachings of Jesus. But many people pick and choose what to believe, right? For example, the Samaritan Jews do not honor any books outside the "Old Testament." They do not accept the Talmud or any of the other rabbinical writings.

Your explanations, nevertheless, are appreciated and welcomed. Is it possible Jews also have many misconceptions about Christianity? Perhaps more freedom to dialogue on these boards would go far to clearing these things up and actually educating people. But it does take time to explain things, and most people really don't care enough to bother. Some are more interested in getting people blocked.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? Wronged

Posted by Angel Girl on January 13, 2005, at 7:51:16

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by Wronged on January 13, 2005, at 5:45:39

wronged

Are you putting me down with your statement below?

Angel Girl


>
> MKB was trying to make the point that Jesus Christ criticized those Pharisees and rabbis who elevated tradition and oral law to an equivalence with Moses's Law. It's hard to see how someone who claims to be a Christian could ignore this part of the teachings of Jesus.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by ayrity on January 13, 2005, at 9:21:02

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by Wronged on January 13, 2005, at 5:45:39

> I'm sure MKB knows that her knowledge of the Talmud is limited. Regardless of your belief that the Oral Law came down from Moses, it can still be argued that the Talmud is NOT in the Old Testament and is not the same thing. It's a matter of perspective, not fact.

I did not say the Talmud and "Old" Testament (Jews do not refer to it as such, 5 Books of Moses would be another way to put it) are the same thing. What I did say is that Jews believe both the Written Law (as reflected in the "Old" Teastament) and the Oral Law (as reflected in the Talmud) are of equal validity.


> MKB was trying to make the point that Jesus Christ criticized those Pharisees and rabbis who elevated tradition and oral law to an equivalence with Moses's Law. It's hard to see how someone who claims to be a Christian could ignore this part of the teachings of Jesus.

As you say, it is a matter of perspective. Jews and Christians simply are not going to agree on this matter.


> But many people pick and choose what to believe, right? For example, the Samaritan Jews do not honor any books outside the "Old Testament." They do not accept the Talmud or any of the other rabbinical writings.

Samaritans are not Jews, they are Samaritans. What they believe has no bearing on Jewish belief.


> Your explanations, nevertheless, are appreciated and welcomed. Is it possible Jews also have many misconceptions about Christianity? Perhaps more freedom to dialogue on these boards would go far to clearing these things up and actually educating people.

Absolutely, I'm sure many Jews do have misconceptions about Christianity. Constructive and friendly dialogue is always welcome in my book.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? Angel Girl

Posted by \wronged on January 13, 2005, at 10:38:58

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? Wronged, posted by Angel Girl on January 13, 2005, at 7:51:16

> wronged
>
> Are you putting me down with your statement below?
>
> Angel Girl
>
Absolutely not! No, I did not have you in mind at all!

>
> >
> > MKB was trying to make the point that Jesus Christ criticized those Pharisees and rabbis who elevated tradition and oral law to an equivalence with Moses's Law. It's hard to see how someone who claims to be a Christian could ignore this part of the teachings of Jesus.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? \wronged

Posted by Angel Girl on January 14, 2005, at 2:57:54

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? Angel Girl, posted by \wronged on January 13, 2005, at 10:38:58

Thank you for clearing this up for me. :)

AG


> > wronged
> >
> > Are you putting me down with your statement below?
> >
> > Angel Girl
> >
> Absolutely not! No, I did not have you in mind at all!
>
> >
> > >
> > > MKB was trying to make the point that Jesus Christ criticized those Pharisees and rabbis who elevated tradition and oral law to an equivalence with Moses's Law. It's hard to see how someone who claims to be a Christian could ignore this part of the teachings of Jesus.
>
>

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by SLS on January 15, 2005, at 11:07:25

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 13, 2005, at 9:21:02

> > I'm sure MKB knows that her knowledge of the Talmud is limited. Regardless of your belief that the Oral Law came down from Moses, it can still be argued that the Talmud is NOT in the Old Testament and is not the same thing. It's a matter of perspective, not fact.
>
> I did not say the Talmud and "Old" Testament (Jews do not refer to it as such, 5 Books of Moses would be another way to put it) are the same thing. What I did say is that Jews believe both the Written Law (as reflected in the "Old" Teastament) and the Oral Law (as reflected in the Talmud) are of equal validity.

I think the Talmud represents an evolving interpretation of the Torah as it is discussed, debated, and commented upon. The Talmud is sort of a commentary on the Torah and sets forth suggested ways of practicing Judaism. One of the most important suggestions is to continue to discuss and debate using this Talmudic method.


- Scott

 

Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or ayrity

Posted by dancingstar on January 23, 2005, at 0:46:16

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? anyone or, posted by ayrity on January 11, 2005, at 11:29:54

You sure do a great job of fielding these questions; simple, concise, and completely accurate, according to my understanding!

I couldn't resist reading to see why poor Angel Girl is so upset and came upon this series of posts.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by Greenhornet on February 18, 2005, at 10:37:39

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith? ayrity, posted by Angel Girl on January 11, 2005, at 13:24:53

Hold on here -- Your comment "usual Christian misundering" is one big generalization. I understand what Talmud is and I am sure so do many of my fellow Believers. Some of us understand your faith/culture better than you might think. After all, the first Christians were Jews, yes Yeshua too, and Sha'ul. It's important to know and understand one's history.

PS other than that you do a great job and your posts are very enlightening and concise. GH

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by Greenhornet on February 18, 2005, at 11:00:34

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on January 13, 2005, at 9:21:02

Whoops, they are Jews, but of mixed ethnicity decended from the Jews deported by the Assyarians in the 8th century bct. Granted, they mixed some
pagan practices with Jewish elements, but they were still Jews, originally from the region of Eretz Yisra'el, the hill country north of Yerushalayim

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by ayrity on February 19, 2005, at 23:01:29

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by Greenhornet on February 18, 2005, at 10:37:39

> Hold on here -- Your comment "usual Christian misundering" is one big generalization.

Yes, you're right. It was wrong of me to generalize. However, Christianity being the prevailing culture of this country, I believe that, generally (there go the generalizations again!), Jews learn more about Christianity than vice versa. I still remember being told that Jews should go sit in the back of the classroom (when I was in 1st grade) so that the teacher could talk about the Christmas story. I stayed in my seat- I was curious (anyway, you couldn't help but hear the story in the back of the room!). I think most Jews have a basic idea about what Christians believe, but I regularly encounter misconceptions on the part of Christians about what Jews believe. Just my experience.

> PS other than that you do a great job and your posts are very enlightening and concise.

I'm no expert, as I said, but thanks. Like I said, constructive and supportive dialogue and true, open-minded curiosity is always welcome.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by ayrity on February 19, 2005, at 23:08:40

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by Greenhornet on February 18, 2005, at 11:00:34

> Whoops, they are Jews, but of mixed ethnicity decended from the Jews deported by the Assyarians in the 8th century bct. Granted, they mixed some
> pagan practices with Jewish elements, but they were still Jews, originally from the region of Eretz Yisra'el, the hill country north of Yerushalayim

I assume you are referring to Samaritans? (It would help if you included a bit of the post you are referring to). The Samaritans might be descended from Jews (not sure about that) but their current religious practice is not considered Judaism by any definition or authority that I am aware of, though there might be some similarities. Their beliefs and practices are so distinct that they are considered a different religion. That is not to say that Judaism is exclusive. For example, the Falashas (Ehtiopian Jews) were readily accepted into mainstream Judaism, though both groups were cut off for centuries and significant differences in practices and culture existed. However, the core beliefs were essentially the same.

 

Re: The Jewish Faith?

Posted by greenhornet on February 20, 2005, at 11:05:30

In reply to Re: The Jewish Faith?, posted by ayrity on February 19, 2005, at 23:08:40

> > Whoops, they are Jews, but of mixed ethnicity decended from the Jews deported by the Assyarians in the 8th century bct. Granted, they mixed some
> > pagan practices with Jewish elements, but they were still Jews, originally from the region of Eretz Yisra'el, the hill country north of Yerushalayim
>
> I assume you are referring to Samaritans? (It would help if you included a bit of the post you are referring to). The Samaritans might be descended from Jews (not sure about that) but their current religious practice is not considered Judaism by any definition or authority that I am aware of, though there might be some similarities. Their beliefs and practices are so distinct that they are considered a different religion. That is not to say that Judaism is exclusive. For example, the Falashas (Ehtiopian Jews) were readily accepted into mainstream Judaism, though both groups were cut off for centuries and significant differences in practices and culture existed. However, the core beliefs were essentially the same.


Thanks for the clarification. By the way, do you know any Messianic Jews.? greenhornet


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