Psycho-Babble Faith Thread 229113

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Hey! I'm a process theologian!

Posted by Dinah on May 25, 2003, at 21:03:35

Just found that out today. :)

 

Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian! Dinah

Posted by wendy b. on May 29, 2003, at 8:55:20

In reply to Hey! I'm a process theologian!, posted by Dinah on May 25, 2003, at 21:03:35

Dinah,

You know you now MUST define that!

Interestedly,

Wendy

 

Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian! wendy b.

Posted by zenhussy on May 29, 2003, at 17:21:02

In reply to Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian! Dinah, posted by wendy b. on May 29, 2003, at 8:55:20

> Dinah,
>
> You know you now MUST define that!
>
> Interestedly,
>
> Wendy

Wendy,

I was hoping someone else would ask since I too have no idea what a process theologian is.

From Dinah's posts though it seems she has a great understanding of many religions and their comparitive similarities and differences.

Dying to know as well,

zenhussy

 

Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian!- Wendy zenhussy

Posted by Dinah on May 29, 2003, at 20:03:52

In reply to Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian! wendy b., posted by zenhussy on May 29, 2003, at 17:21:02

Chuckle. Well, I had never heard the term before Sunday. And I'm not sure it was applied in a positive way. :) But naturally I raced home to see what on earth it meant, and found that I do in fact subscribe to some variant of process theology.

I have been largely influenced in my ideas of God by Rabbi Harold Kushner, and I thought that his thought was typical Jewish thought since it fits in with what I've read by other Jewish authors as well. But apparently he is viewed as a process theologian as well.

A process theologian believes God created the world, but doesn't intervene in a physical way on a day to day basis. He allows man to exercise his free will, which means that horrible things sometimes happen. And since he doesn't intervene in the natural laws of nature, there is illness and death. And he grieves with us, supports us, strengthens us, hopes that we choose the right path, is happy when we do, and sad when we don't.

This type of theology partially answers the age old question of why bad things happen to good people, but some people believe that the God described by process theologians is a weak and ineffectual one. They don't like the idea that God is not omniscient and omnipotent (even if it was his own plan to limit the use of his powers), and urges rather than compels. So there is a lot of criticism of process theology on that point.

Since I'm new to the whole idea myself, I may not have explained it well. Here is an excerpt from:

A Theology of Joy: God in the Process
a service presented by Rev. Elizabeth L. Greene and Bernard Zaleha
Boise Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
March 14, 1999

"God's role, now that God has gotten things rolling, is radically different from the omniscience, omnipotence and judgment with which many of us are familiar-in process theology, God is always interacting with creation. God's nature is relatedness with creation; God's nature is creative and responsive love. The Creator endowed each thing in the universe with the Creator's "initial aim," which is, in process theologian John Cobb's words "to actualize the best possibilities open to it, given its concrete situation." (51)

If we and other created beings do our very best to be in harmony with God, we will be most likely to be making a moral, just, beautiful universe. But, of course, we may live in such a way that we ignore our God-relatedness and do otherwise. Process theologians make it clear that we have the power of self-determination, and may choose to be one with the initial aim-or not. In our ongoing responsiveness to God and to others, we may choose either good or evil.

God responds to the created world-to our choices-in sympathy and compassion, for God is interdependent with the created world. And so, we affect the Divine Creative Force, just as it affects us in infusing us with its creative initial aim.

God is here and God is now, calling us to the highest. We are inescapably related to the Divine, and our choices affect it. Our lives profoundly affect other living and non-living beings. In this complex web of interdependent processes, we have the options of choosing death or choosing life."

Of course, all the standard disclaimers apply. I'm not saying that process theology is true. I'm certainly not saying that other views of God are incorrect. I'm just saying I was given a label to describe my beliefs, and I'm always excited at learning a new label for myself.

 

Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian!

Posted by Miller on May 30, 2003, at 1:08:33

In reply to Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian!- Wendy zenhussy, posted by Dinah on May 29, 2003, at 20:03:52

I think, then, I would be a partial process theologian, if that's possible.

I believe God created us with free will. Bad things happens due to our free will (ultimately). But I do think God can have His hand in day to day living. I believe in miracles. I believe praying to God and His Saints will never be pointless.

So, I guess that makes me partial. :)

I'll use the disclaimer as well.

These are joint my points of view and I understand there are many other beliefs and religions. My views may not be everyone's views, and I understand that. I hope this post isn't offensive to anyone.

-Miller

 

great explanation Dinah

Posted by zenhussy on May 30, 2003, at 9:41:11

In reply to Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian!- Wendy zenhussy, posted by Dinah on May 29, 2003, at 20:03:52

That does help clarify the mystery of just what a process theologian is.

It sounds like a rather nice belief and I'm glad you've come to that. Or maybe it came to you? Either way it sounds beautiful.

Thanks for the excerpt Dinah.

zenhussy

 

Re: ...to the Process Theologian Dinah

Posted by wendy b. on June 4, 2003, at 23:11:09

In reply to Re: Hey! I'm a process theologian!- Wendy zenhussy, posted by Dinah on May 29, 2003, at 20:03:52

> Chuckle. Well, I had never heard the term before Sunday. And I'm not sure it was applied in a positive way. :) But naturally I raced home to see what on earth it meant, and found that I do in fact subscribe to some variant of process theology.

Don't you just love a research project? (smiles)

> I have been largely influenced in my ideas of God by Rabbi Harold Kushner, and I thought that his thought was typical Jewish thought since it fits in with what I've read by other Jewish authors as well. But apparently he is viewed as a process theologian as well.

Very interesting -- that you were drawn to someone's teachings who was identified by others as a process theologian. Don't you think?


> A process theologian believes God created the world, but doesn't intervene in a physical way on a day to day basis. He allows man to exercise his free will, which means that horrible things sometimes happen. And since he doesn't intervene in the natural laws of nature, there is illness and death. And he grieves with us, supports us, strengthens us, hopes that we choose the right path, is happy when we do, and sad when we don't.

I like this was of dealing with the idea of free will (though I'm still not sure that it exists - for me).


> This type of theology partially answers the age old question of why bad things happen to good people, but some people believe that the God described by process theologians is a weak and ineffectual one. They don't like the idea that God is not omniscient and omnipotent (even if it was his own plan to limit the use of his powers), and urges rather than compels. So there is a lot of criticism of process theology on that point.

I always had a hard time with religions that viewed God as omnipotent and powerful, because to me this meant: scary. And it's hard to snuggle up to the idea of god, when he's busy throwing lightening-bolts and raging. It's probably easier for me to think of God as a gentler force in the universe.


> Since I'm new to the whole idea myself, I may not have explained it well. Here is an excerpt from:
>
> A Theology of Joy: God in the Process
> a service presented by Rev. Elizabeth L. Greene and Bernard Zaleha
> Boise Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
> March 14, 1999
>
> "God's role, now that God has gotten things rolling, is radically different from the omniscience, omnipotence and judgment with which many of us are familiar-in process theology, God is always interacting with creation. God's nature is relatedness with creation; God's nature is creative and responsive love. The Creator endowed each thing in the universe with the Creator's "initial aim," which is, in process theologian John Cobb's words "to actualize the best possibilities open to it, given its concrete situation." (51)
>
> If we and other created beings do our very best to be in harmony with God, we will be most likely to be making a moral, just, beautiful universe. But, of course, we may live in such a way that we ignore our God-relatedness and do otherwise. Process theologians make it clear that we have the power of self-determination, and may choose to be one with the initial aim-or not. In our ongoing responsiveness to God and to others, we may choose either good or evil.
>
> God responds to the created world-to our choices-in sympathy and compassion, for God is interdependent with the created world. And so, we affect the Divine Creative Force, just as it affects us in infusing us with its creative initial aim.
>
> God is here and God is now, calling us to the highest. We are inescapably related to the Divine, and our choices affect it. Our lives profoundly affect other living and non-living beings. In this complex web of interdependent processes, we have the options of choosing death or choosing life."

This is a very nicely-written explanation. Also, very Unitarian! (-- and don't anybody get their knickers in a twist - I am a registered member of the Unitarian church where I live), in its focus on god (and not Jesus), and on its belief in a just, humane world.

> Of course, all the standard disclaimers apply.

Of course...

>I'm not saying that process theology is true. I'm certainly not saying that other views of God are incorrect.

... of course not.


>I'm just saying I was given a label to describe my beliefs, and I'm always excited at learning a new label for myself.

Heh heh. Me too. Funny how fascinating we depressed/anxious people find ourselves... (sighs)


best wishes, Dinah,
Wendy


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