Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1076776

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Re: Non-prescription lithium products linkadge

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 16, 2015, at 19:43:31

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by linkadge on February 16, 2015, at 19:21:40

Thanks, that's really helpful.

If you take a extremely low dose of lithium carbonate.... or if you take lithium orotate, how long do the psychological effects last?

The effect on colours doesn't sound too positive. A reduced vividness. Is that a negative experience?

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 18, 2015, at 13:03:58

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products linkadge, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 16, 2015, at 19:43:31

For me it lasts two days.

Two days after i forgot to refill my lithium O, i had tho
ese negative thoughts we talked about and nobody wants back.

Two days after 10mg lithium a day (240mg orotate).

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by linkadge on February 18, 2015, at 19:19:08

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 18, 2015, at 13:03:58

Yeah, I do notice after a day or two.

In terms of the colors, I don't see it as a negative. I can still see the colors for what they are, but its like I can see more of the details with less distraction. Its seems to be like looking at a black and white photograph (although I still see color fine) in the sense that I see more of the details.

Actually, on lithium, my ability to draw, especially geometric figures is improved. I seem to be able to see 3D structure better. It may just be in my mind though :)

Linkadge

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2015, at 6:41:08

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by linkadge on February 18, 2015, at 19:19:08

It might be your mind.

I heard people complain their creativity is dulled by lithium. Not for you though so thats good!

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by linkadge on February 19, 2015, at 14:22:05

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2015, at 6:41:08

No, its not my creativity that has improved.

I see creativity as being able to create something novel, or different. I.e. the ability to connect existing ideas in new ways. Lithium has not improved this for me. However, I seem to be able to more accurately draw, for instance, a picture of the Eiffel Tower from a model or a photograph. I'm not creating something new, but better able to see what's there and record it.

Linkadge

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products linkadge

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 19, 2015, at 20:15:37

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by linkadge on February 19, 2015, at 14:22:05

> No, its not my creativity that has improved.
>
> I see creativity as being able to create something novel, or different. I.e. the ability to connect existing ideas in new ways. Lithium has not improved this for me. However, I seem to be able to more accurately draw, for instance, a picture of the Eiffel Tower from a model or a photograph. I'm not creating something new, but better able to see what's there and record it.

I know you said you took 1500mg Li carbonate at one point? How did this affect you?

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 20, 2015, at 8:18:32

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products linkadge, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 19, 2015, at 20:15:37

id be anxious taking so much lithium but its supposed to be a really good mood stabilizer.
The unique thing is it protects against both mania and depression, so you cant go wrong with it mood wise.
We need more meds like that.

I have never been manic without ADs and never will, but on meds i have been manic in the past.
Manic in comparison to my standards at least. Maybe because i wasnt used to NOT being depressed.
Then again, it might have been more of psychosis than mania. Pretty sure it was as i still had sad thoughts and the like.
I have been crying after being numb for so long.

Its hard to say where depression begins and ends. But we are not supposed to not enjoy life is my opinion. We should be reasonably happy.

Now though i think the antipsychotic im taking will protect me. (When rapastinel comes out!)
It is complicated.

It would be easier with drugs like lithium. But i wont take the risks associated with it. Neither the weight gain.

If there was no weight gain and no thyroid and kidney issues, id be on it in a heart beat even though im not full blown bipolar.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by linkadge on February 20, 2015, at 21:30:08

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 20, 2015, at 8:18:32

I never gained weight on lithium (I wish), but neither have I gained a pound on remeron or amitriptyline. In terms of thyroid and kidney function, I think both of these can be managed. I read a statistic that most people can take lithium for life, if needed. Perhaps with diminished kidney function in later years. My mother is 65 now and has been on lithium for about 35 years. She has no thyroid issues, but some mild kidney issues (probably affected by her weight).

The thing with lithium (for me) is that there were benefits to even lower doses. So, yes one might need 900mg if suffering from full blown bipolar I, but lower doses are probably underused in other forms of bipolar and unipolar.

I would say that the course of unipolar illness would probably be a lot better for many patients who took low dose lithium (irrespective of an immediate clinical benefit).

If I could choose, I'd probably take 300-450mg of lithium. Combined with the milder mood stabilizing effects of omega-3, I could get by.

Combinations such as 300mg of lithium + 250mg of Depakote + 1000-2000 EPA+DHA + 500mcg of folic acid would probably help a number of severe bipolar cases with fewer overall side effects.

Folic acid has been shown in a few studies to improve the clinical effects of both lithium and Depakote.

Linkadge

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by linkadge on February 20, 2015, at 21:33:09

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 20, 2015, at 8:18:32

I would say that under say....450, I noticed no cognitive dampening effects of lithium. If anything, learning and cognition were improved by a reduction in the background noise.

Higher than 600mg seemed too be a bit more heavy. My ability to think deeply was improved dramatically, but at the expense of loss of short term fluidity.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 21, 2015, at 1:05:52

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by linkadge on February 20, 2015, at 21:33:09

You know what i think?

Anyone in a locked psychiatric ward should be tried on low dose lithium.

Because they might not need to be there any longer as it was the case with me!

Its no fun being there.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 22, 2015, at 15:33:58

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 21, 2015, at 1:05:52

The fact that you're on a lithium salt now shows that you can tolerate very low dose lithium. Whether slightly more would be helpful, maybe....

What dose of lithium carbonate did you take when you had side effects?

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 23, 2015, at 4:29:49

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 22, 2015, at 15:33:58

> The fact that you're on a lithium salt now shows that you can tolerate very low dose lithium. Whether slightly more would be helpful, maybe....
>
> What dose of lithium carbonate did you take when you had side effects?

Oh i dont remember exactly. Maybe 300 or 400. Weight gain was my complaint!

I think im making a Switch to clozapine to avoid tardive akathisia and tardive dyskinesia.

I dont want to walk around and look like an idiot. Plus, aktahisia or dyskinesia can really make your life miserable.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 23, 2015, at 11:45:26

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 23, 2015, at 4:29:49

>Oh i dont remember exactly. Maybe 300 or 400. Weight gain was my complaint!

You'd be able to take 100mg of lithium carbonate with no side effects, I imagine. You might benefit.

>I think im making a switch to clozapine to avoid tardive akathisia and tardive dyskinesia.

Do you have risk factors such as a history of acute movement disorders with your current meds?

Clozapine causes excessive salivation very frequently, which is mainly a problem at night. It's common for people to wake up to a wet pillow. Are you OK with the blood tests? - initially weekly.

Clozapine is one of the most sedating antipsychotics. You would probably sleep well on it. It seems to reduce suicidal thinking and psychotic symptoms more effectively than any other APs. Although you would need to reduce your current meds gradually (and probably overlap them with clozapine when starting), you probably wouldn't need to take any other antipsychotic in combination with clozapine on a long-term basis.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 23, 2015, at 11:47:21

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 23, 2015, at 11:45:26

Yeah i know.

I am undecided between cannabidiol (would cost my father a hell of a lot of money) and Clozapine.

Im scared of the heart effects of clozapine.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 23, 2015, at 12:54:26

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 23, 2015, at 11:47:21

>I am undecided between cannabidiol (would cost my father a hell of a lot of money) and Clozapine.
>
> Im scared of the heart effects of clozapine.

You could stick with what you're on already. If not, clozapine is an established treatment. Cannabidiol is not, and how would you know the product you were taking was genuine?

To minimise the risk of TD, you shouldn't really be on three APs, if you are still taking pipamperone!

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 23, 2015, at 12:58:08

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 23, 2015, at 12:54:26

> You could stick with what you're on already. If not, clozapine is an established treatment. Cannabidiol is not, and how would you know the product you were taking was genuine?

I would know its from the german pharmacy from THC pharm.

> To minimise the risk of TD, you shouldn't really be on three APs, if you are still taking pipamperone!

Im not on pipamperone anymore.

What im currently on, how big is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia or similar disorders?

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 23, 2015, at 16:40:01

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 23, 2015, at 12:58:08

>What I'm currently on, how big is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia or similar disorders?

That depends on several factors, particularly you age. Olanzapine and quetiapine do not often cause TD in young people.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 24, 2015, at 3:28:17

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 23, 2015, at 16:40:01

What does "not often" mean? like 3 out of 100?

Young People meaning People below the Age of xx?

What can i do to protect myself?

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products Lamdage22

Posted by ed_uk2010 on February 26, 2015, at 7:57:40

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on February 24, 2015, at 3:28:17

>What does "not often" mean? like 3 out of 100?

It's not possible to say, because there isn't a study for your specific medication combination.

>Young People meaning People below the Age of xx?

Risk increases gradually with age, as far as I know. It doesn't suddenly become high risk after a certain age. Overall, tardive dyskinesia is much more common in people over ~ 60.

>What can i do to protect myself?

Evidence comes from a combination of animal studies and small trials in humans, mainly using older antipsychotics.

Certain supplements may be helpful:

Vitamin E. You could consider taking up to a maximum of 400 units once daily. Do not take more, too much vitamin E is bad for you.

Vitamin C. You could take a supplement eg. 200mg/day.

Vitamin B complex. Vitamin B6 is possibly useful in TD. Huge doses can cause side effects - avoid. A vitamin B complex containing B6 might be suitable.

Fish oil - fish oil supplements may be useful in psychosis and possibly in TD. You could take a few capsules per day, depending on the brand.

Melatonin - there is a very small amount of evidence that some people with TD may be helped by melatonin. Although there is no evidence that melatonin prevents TD, it might be beneficial as an antioxidant. It could also reduce your insomnia slightly.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products ed_uk2010

Posted by phidippus on March 2, 2015, at 13:59:36

In reply to Non-prescription lithium products, posted by ed_uk2010 on February 16, 2015, at 17:57:09

Lithium aspartate and lithium orotate are gaining recognition as supplements that can help decrease signs of brain aging, slow dementia, and fight depression and addiction. Lithium is a mineral that has long been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression. Although the drug can be toxic in high doses, lithium supplements may appeal to those seeking to treat brain illnesses with natural, over-the-counter remedies. However, consult your physician before taking any supplements.
What Is Lithium?

Although the word "lithium" conjures images of psychiatric medication, it is actually a natural alkali metal salt in the same family of minerals as potassium and sodium. Lithium is extracted from mineral springs and brine pools. It is also mined from igneous rock. The two main sources of lithium in the world are Kings Mountain, North Carolina and a salt desert in the Andes Mountains of Chile.

Lithium Salt Binders

Lithium requires a binder, or transporter, to make it accessible to the body. It cannot be absorbed without this binder. Eskalith and Lithobid, the formulations of lithium prescribed to bipolar patients, use carbonate as a transporter. Carbonate is a formulation of carbon and oxygen. Orotate is a salt derived from orotic acid frequently used as a binder for mineral supplements. Aspartate comes from aspartic acid, an amino acid.

Lithium aspartate and lithium orotate are available over-the-counter and contain lower dosages of lithium than lithium carbonate, which must be prescribed by a doctor. Most proponents of low-dose lithium therapy such as Dr. Jonathan Wright recommend them equally. However, aspartate is thought to be an excitotoxin, a substance that binds to nerve cell receptors and may cause damaging over-stimulation. Marlina E. Borkwood, MSc states that excitotoxins can cause headaches, brain edema, eye inflammation, vascular system and central nervous system problems in sensitive individuals. Those who want to try low-dose lithium therapy and have experienced sensitivity to another excitotoxin, monosodium glutamate -- a food additive commonly known as MSG -- may wish to stick with lithium orotate.

Lithium for Alzheimer's

Lithium supplementation is gaining recognition as a preventative measure against Alzheimer's disease, with aspartate and orotate the binders used in the recommended supplements. According to Dr. Jonathan V. Wright, the medical director of the Renton, Washington-based Tahoma Clinic, lithium therapy can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and senile dementia. A 2000 study conducted by Dr. Gregory Moore, director of the Brain Imaging Research Division of the Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan, performed MRI scans on 10 bipolar subjects before and after four weeks of lithium treatment. The post-treatment scans revealed a significant increase in gray matter volume compared to the pre-treatment scans. Dr. Moore's study used lithium carbonate, but proponents of lithium aspartate and lithium orotate treatment see the results as indicative of the overall efficacy of lithium against Alzheimer's.


Lithium for Mental Illness and Addiction

Prescription lithium carbonate, along with valproic acid and lamotrigine, is a first-line mood stabilizer used for managing bipolar disorder. It is also occasionally used as an adjuvant medication for unipolar depression. According to Dr. Wright, lithium can also be helpful in treating alcoholism. He prescribes his alcoholic patients 10 mg of lithium orotate three times daily, in conjunction with dietary changes, niacin, glutamine and other supplements, and reports that the majority of his patients experience improved mood and decreased desire to drink after approximately six weeks of lithium therapy. A 2006 study published in the British Journal of Addiction reports that symptoms of alcoholism and affective disturbance decreased in patients treated with lithium carbonate.
Considerations

Lithium is toxic in high doses, with symptoms of toxicity including hand tremors, excessive thirst, frequent urination, nausea and vomiting. Extreme toxicity is indicated by drowsiness, loss of coordination, muscular weakness, blurred vision and ringing in the ears. Significant weight gain is a well-known side effect that causes a portion of those prescribed lithium for mental illness to quit taking their medication. Because renal failure is possible in cases of lithium toxicity, serum monitoring of lithium levels is crucial in those taking doses high enough to treat bipolar disorder.

Eric

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products phidippus

Posted by Tomatheus on March 2, 2015, at 14:13:26

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products ed_uk2010, posted by phidippus on March 2, 2015, at 13:59:36

> Lithium aspartate and lithium orotate are gaining recognition as supplements that can help decrease signs of brain aging, slow dementia, and fight depression and addiction. Lithium is a mineral that has long been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression. Although the drug can be toxic in high doses, lithium supplements may appeal to those seeking to treat brain illnesses with natural, over-the-counter remedies. However, consult your physician before taking any supplements.
> What Is Lithium?
>
> Although the word "lithium" conjures images of psychiatric medication, it is actually a natural alkali metal salt in the same family of minerals as potassium and sodium. Lithium is extracted from mineral springs and brine pools. It is also mined from igneous rock. The two main sources of lithium in the world are Kings Mountain, North Carolina and a salt desert in the Andes Mountains of Chile.
>
> Lithium Salt Binders
>
> Lithium requires a binder, or transporter, to make it accessible to the body. It cannot be absorbed without this binder. Eskalith and Lithobid, the formulations of lithium prescribed to bipolar patients, use carbonate as a transporter. Carbonate is a formulation of carbon and oxygen. Orotate is a salt derived from orotic acid frequently used as a binder for mineral supplements. Aspartate comes from aspartic acid, an amino acid.
>
> Lithium aspartate and lithium orotate are available over-the-counter and contain lower dosages of lithium than lithium carbonate, which must be prescribed by a doctor. Most proponents of low-dose lithium therapy such as Dr. Jonathan Wright recommend them equally. However, aspartate is thought to be an excitotoxin, a substance that binds to nerve cell receptors and may cause damaging over-stimulation. Marlina E. Borkwood, MSc states that excitotoxins can cause headaches, brain edema, eye inflammation, vascular system and central nervous system problems in sensitive individuals. Those who want to try low-dose lithium therapy and have experienced sensitivity to another excitotoxin, monosodium glutamate -- a food additive commonly known as MSG -- may wish to stick with lithium orotate.
>
> Lithium for Alzheimer's
>
> Lithium supplementation is gaining recognition as a preventative measure against Alzheimer's disease, with aspartate and orotate the binders used in the recommended supplements. According to Dr. Jonathan V. Wright, the medical director of the Renton, Washington-based Tahoma Clinic, lithium therapy can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and senile dementia. A 2000 study conducted by Dr. Gregory Moore, director of the Brain Imaging Research Division of the Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan, performed MRI scans on 10 bipolar subjects before and after four weeks of lithium treatment. The post-treatment scans revealed a significant increase in gray matter volume compared to the pre-treatment scans. Dr. Moore's study used lithium carbonate, but proponents of lithium aspartate and lithium orotate treatment see the results as indicative of the overall efficacy of lithium against Alzheimer's.
>
>
> Lithium for Mental Illness and Addiction
>
> Prescription lithium carbonate, along with valproic acid and lamotrigine, is a first-line mood stabilizer used for managing bipolar disorder. It is also occasionally used as an adjuvant medication for unipolar depression. According to Dr. Wright, lithium can also be helpful in treating alcoholism. He prescribes his alcoholic patients 10 mg of lithium orotate three times daily, in conjunction with dietary changes, niacin, glutamine and other supplements, and reports that the majority of his patients experience improved mood and decreased desire to drink after approximately six weeks of lithium therapy. A 2006 study published in the British Journal of Addiction reports that symptoms of alcoholism and affective disturbance decreased in patients treated with lithium carbonate.
> Considerations
>
> Lithium is toxic in high doses, with symptoms of toxicity including hand tremors, excessive thirst, frequent urination, nausea and vomiting. Extreme toxicity is indicated by drowsiness, loss of coordination, muscular weakness, blurred vision and ringing in the ears. Significant weight gain is a well-known side effect that causes a portion of those prescribed lithium for mental illness to quit taking their medication. Because renal failure is possible in cases of lithium toxicity, serum monitoring of lithium levels is crucial in those taking doses high enough to treat bipolar disorder.
>
> Eric

All of the above was found here:
http://www.livestrong.com/article/316987-lithium-aspartate-vs-lithium-orotate/

Tomatheus

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on March 2, 2015, at 14:18:20

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products phidippus, posted by Tomatheus on March 2, 2015, at 14:13:26

Id recommend Lithium Orotate to anyone who is suicidal.

It seems to not matter what kind of lithium it is as long as it is lithium.

For this purpose i dont need a high dose at all and (for this purpose) i dont find higher dosages have any additional advantage.

Im not bipolar.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on March 2, 2015, at 14:31:59

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on March 2, 2015, at 14:18:20

If you ever see or hear a suicidal person, let them know about lithium.

Saved my *ss. I may still be in the hospital with no personal freedom whatsoever.

I think no one likes to kill themselves. At least non-violent people.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products

Posted by Lamdage22 on March 2, 2015, at 14:32:25

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products, posted by Lamdage22 on March 2, 2015, at 14:31:59

At low dose: No side effects whatsoever.

 

Re: Non-prescription lithium products Tomatheus

Posted by phidippus on March 3, 2015, at 0:22:21

In reply to Re: Non-prescription lithium products phidippus, posted by Tomatheus on March 2, 2015, at 14:13:26

> > Lithium aspartate and lithium orotate are gaining recognition as supplements that can help decrease signs of brain aging, slow dementia, and fight depression and addiction. Lithium is a mineral that has long been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression. Although the drug can be toxic in high doses, lithium supplements may appeal to those seeking to treat brain illnesses with natural, over-the-counter remedies. However, consult your physician before taking any supplements.
> > What Is Lithium?
> >
> > Although the word "lithium" conjures images of psychiatric medication, it is actually a natural alkali metal salt in the same family of minerals as potassium and sodium. Lithium is extracted from mineral springs and brine pools. It is also mined from igneous rock. The two main sources of lithium in the world are Kings Mountain, North Carolina and a salt desert in the Andes Mountains of Chile.
> >
> > Lithium Salt Binders
> >
> > Lithium requires a binder, or transporter, to make it accessible to the body. It cannot be absorbed without this binder. Eskalith and Lithobid, the formulations of lithium prescribed to bipolar patients, use carbonate as a transporter. Carbonate is a formulation of carbon and oxygen. Orotate is a salt derived from orotic acid frequently used as a binder for mineral supplements. Aspartate comes from aspartic acid, an amino acid.
> >
> > Lithium aspartate and lithium orotate are available over-the-counter and contain lower dosages of lithium than lithium carbonate, which must be prescribed by a doctor. Most proponents of low-dose lithium therapy such as Dr. Jonathan Wright recommend them equally. However, aspartate is thought to be an excitotoxin, a substance that binds to nerve cell receptors and may cause damaging over-stimulation. Marlina E. Borkwood, MSc states that excitotoxins can cause headaches, brain edema, eye inflammation, vascular system and central nervous system problems in sensitive individuals. Those who want to try low-dose lithium therapy and have experienced sensitivity to another excitotoxin, monosodium glutamate -- a food additive commonly known as MSG -- may wish to stick with lithium orotate.
> >
> > Lithium for Alzheimer's
> >
> > Lithium supplementation is gaining recognition as a preventative measure against Alzheimer's disease, with aspartate and orotate the binders used in the recommended supplements. According to Dr. Jonathan V. Wright, the medical director of the Renton, Washington-based Tahoma Clinic, lithium therapy can slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and senile dementia. A 2000 study conducted by Dr. Gregory Moore, director of the Brain Imaging Research Division of the Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan, performed MRI scans on 10 bipolar subjects before and after four weeks of lithium treatment. The post-treatment scans revealed a significant increase in gray matter volume compared to the pre-treatment scans. Dr. Moore's study used lithium carbonate, but proponents of lithium aspartate and lithium orotate treatment see the results as indicative of the overall efficacy of lithium against Alzheimer's.
> >
> >
> > Lithium for Mental Illness and Addiction
> >
> > Prescription lithium carbonate, along with valproic acid and lamotrigine, is a first-line mood stabilizer used for managing bipolar disorder. It is also occasionally used as an adjuvant medication for unipolar depression. According to Dr. Wright, lithium can also be helpful in treating alcoholism. He prescribes his alcoholic patients 10 mg of lithium orotate three times daily, in conjunction with dietary changes, niacin, glutamine and other supplements, and reports that the majority of his patients experience improved mood and decreased desire to drink after approximately six weeks of lithium therapy. A 2006 study published in the British Journal of Addiction reports that symptoms of alcoholism and affective disturbance decreased in patients treated with lithium carbonate.
> > Considerations
> >
> > Lithium is toxic in high doses, with symptoms of toxicity including hand tremors, excessive thirst, frequent urination, nausea and vomiting. Extreme toxicity is indicated by drowsiness, loss of coordination, muscular weakness, blurred vision and ringing in the ears. Significant weight gain is a well-known side effect that causes a portion of those prescribed lithium for mental illness to quit taking their medication. Because renal failure is possible in cases of lithium toxicity, serum monitoring of lithium levels is crucial in those taking doses high enough to treat bipolar disorder.
> >
> > Eric
>
> All of the above was found here:
> http://www.livestrong.com/article/316987-lithium-aspartate-vs-lithium-orotate/
>
> Tomatheus

Thanks for the link, I forgot to write that in my original post

Eric


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