Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1067865

Shown: posts 1 to 11 of 11. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

generics can vary up to 45%

Posted by Phil on July 3, 2014, at 14:32:04

my doc was out of town and i ran out of quetiapine the day before. i talked to another psychiatrist in the same office. highly rated doctor. i told him i was out of seroquel but my doc would be back in a few days. can i get just one sample of seroquel with 4 pills and can you tell me if you have had patients complaining about these generics. he said generics can vary up to 45%. i had not heard of that before.
when i was taking my first generic i had to go to bed in 40 minutes because i could hardly walk. the switch they made 2 months ago i would take and be up 3 hours. my pharmacist said his company could only get the bad generic because that's how the company was set up. he is telling me the truth. when i went on disability the pharmacist said i will take care of you
(on pricing) true to his word no one gets close. i've seen them for 20 years and go 20 miles out of my way to stick with them. so, i'll try the second generic again and try to make it work. we'll see. i wrote down the mfg names but right now i can't find them. if i do i'll post them here.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45% Phil

Posted by Phillipa on July 3, 2014, at 18:09:45

In reply to generics can vary up to 45%, posted by Phil on July 3, 2014, at 14:32:04

I've not heard of this before? Phillipa

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45%

Posted by linkadge on July 3, 2014, at 19:20:31

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45% Phil, posted by Phillipa on July 3, 2014, at 18:09:45

I know they can vary. I don't think it is up to 45% however.

Linkadge

 

so, generic vs generic, not brand?

Posted by Phil on July 3, 2014, at 22:46:44

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45%, posted by linkadge on July 3, 2014, at 19:20:31

but comparing two generics but not one generic to brand is this possible

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3150029/

At least theoretically, in the case of two generic drugs administration may exist individuals who can show a difference in Cmax and AUC up to 45% between the two drugs! We can imagine that a patient receives a drug with drug bioavailability parameters located at one end of target range -20%, compared with the brand drug while there is and another patient who received another generic drug with parameters of bioavailability as upper limit of + 25% compared with the original product. If we add to this range and tolerance between quantities of active ingredient from the same batch - of +/- 5%, resulting that between two generic drugs may exist theoretical differences that might go to extremes up to 55%! This is why the authorities in the field of medicine do not put equal sign between two generic (9).


 

Re: generics can vary up to 45%

Posted by europerep on July 4, 2014, at 12:20:19

In reply to generics can vary up to 45%, posted by Phil on July 3, 2014, at 14:32:04

But 45% of what? tmax? Cmax? Area under the curve? etc...

Whether a generic product is pharmacologically identical to the brand product only really matters when you take the brand product while it's still patented, and then you switch when generics are released. If you get started on a generic right away, it doesn't really matter if it slightly differs from the brand product. (Unless of course it's a fucked up formulation that leads to much lower bioavailability or something like that.)

What matters more to me is that a product, generic or brand, is "internally" consistent, i.e. that one capsule or tablet contains the exact same amount of the drug as another one. I am currently switching from one amitriptyline product to another, because the first started to produce inconsistent results (at a time when a range of other products of the same company were recalled for precisely that problem: unstable content of active ingredient). The new product works as well as the old one did before I started to notice unstable results a few months ago, so I am pretty sure that there was something wrong with the last batch I got.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45% europerep

Posted by Phil on July 4, 2014, at 13:38:08

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45%, posted by europerep on July 4, 2014, at 12:20:19

Amitrip was the first drug that worked for me but i was manic many times and my dipshit doctor never caught it.
BTW, i have been here a long time but knowing all of the science is not my bag. I read that some hospitals are saving money by not switching generics or maybe going with brand. It was more expensive to put out fires than just stay with one formula and some diseases require exact doses. In America, they probably charge $100 per pill for either one if the patient pays. Insurance company's pay a fraction of that.
all i know is that my quetiapine generics are not even close. i can't get better because i'm on medicare.
totally agree with your post europerep.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45% Phil

Posted by europerep on July 4, 2014, at 14:26:17

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45% europerep, posted by Phil on July 4, 2014, at 13:38:08

Ah, now I understand, you have to switch brands because of your healthcare provider? In that case it sucks of course, I thought you had to go with samples of a different brand for a few days until your doc is back in town. Then I would have said to just hold out and get back on the old brand as soon as possible.

Maybe your new product releases the quetiapine slightly slower, or quicker, or something like that, so that even if the two products contain the exact same amount of active ingredient, they feel different to you. This is the type of stuff that most people who haven't been on these meds don't get. Or maybe it's also just me who is hypersensitive or something... But if you continue taking the meds you take now, you'll likely adjust to them after some time. Or at least that's a possibility.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45%

Posted by alexandra_k on July 4, 2014, at 19:00:44

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45% Phil, posted by europerep on July 4, 2014, at 14:26:17

i guess that it is also possible that the supposed fillers or whatever have biological activity of their own...

like how (for me anyway) quitting smoking was bloody difficult with all the nicotine substitutes... i swear that there are more substances in cigarettes that are *physically* addictive. hence withdrawal from removal of all that...

it could be that the stuff that nobody thinks makes much of a difference... actually does.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45%

Posted by Phil on July 4, 2014, at 19:52:13

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45%, posted by alexandra_k on July 4, 2014, at 19:00:44

i bought an ecig 2 years and 10 days ago. threw my 8 last cigs in the trash. still addicted to nicotine but at least i'm not killing myself.
2 packs a day for almost 40 years. saved $9000.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45% alexandra_k

Posted by europerep on July 5, 2014, at 15:55:18

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45%, posted by alexandra_k on July 4, 2014, at 19:00:44

Yeah, that's one of the things I had in mind. I'm pretty sure even that fillers and all that have an impact on drug absorption speed, and maybe even a little on bioavailability.

Although I think that, with pharmaceutical agents, those effects are probably mostly known (at least by "experts"), whereas with cigarettes, it looks to me like noone really knows what exactly is in there and what it does.

 

Re: generics can vary up to 45%

Posted by Zyprexa on July 7, 2014, at 22:10:43

In reply to Re: generics can vary up to 45%, posted by Phil on July 4, 2014, at 19:52:13

I agree with Phil. Since starting ecig in Nov. I've gotten off all other nicotine supliments and only smoke >1 cig a day.


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