Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1065110

Shown: posts 1 to 12 of 12. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

TMS = BS

Posted by babbler20 on May 2, 2014, at 15:14:48

I just completed 7 weeks of TMS therapy and I don't feel any different. All that money spent and gas burned, and nothing. I would not recommend this treatment to anyone. The procedure induces very painful headaches every 30 seconds for 35 minutes.The sensation does not get better over time.

 

Re: TMS = BS

Posted by Linkadge on May 2, 2014, at 19:58:37

In reply to TMS = BS, posted by babbler20 on May 2, 2014, at 15:14:48

Hey, it could be worse. It could be failed ECT

 

Re: TMS = BS

Posted by babbler20 on May 2, 2014, at 20:07:36

In reply to Re: TMS = BS, posted by Linkadge on May 2, 2014, at 19:58:37

That is true. Did yo fail ECT?

 

Re: TMS = BS

Posted by Phillipa on May 2, 2014, at 22:28:48

In reply to Re: TMS = BS, posted by babbler20 on May 2, 2014, at 20:07:36

One can't fail a proceedure the proceedure fails the person. Phillipa

 

Re: TMS = BS babbler20

Posted by Chris O on May 3, 2014, at 2:39:33

In reply to TMS = BS, posted by babbler20 on May 2, 2014, at 15:14:48

I have never understood how TMS could provide an effective long-term option for treatment of anxiety and depression. Even if it does influence neuronal firing and neurotransmitter levels, wouldn't it need to be an at-home lifetime treatment to have the long-term benefits it's supposed to bestow? And if it does require such "chronic" treatment, my god, who could afford it?

 

Re: TMS = BS Chris O

Posted by tom2228 on May 3, 2014, at 9:43:53

In reply to Re: TMS = BS babbler20, posted by Chris O on May 3, 2014, at 2:39:33

> I have never understood how TMS could provide an effective long-term option for treatment of anxiety and depression. Even if it does influence neuronal firing and neurotransmitter levels, wouldn't it need to be an at-home lifetime treatment to have the long-term benefits it's supposed to bestow? And if it does require such "chronic" treatment, my god, who could afford it?

I think the idea is that if it helps the person come out of their depression for long enough, they can learn to live in a new way, learn to be happier -- that way since they have learned it, the benefits may stick around for some time.

Like so some meds that I no longer that seem to have left an imprint in my psyche because of what they taught me, or rather the adaptive ways of living that I learned from it.

For example even if I stop taking my stimulant, while a lot of symptoms return, I am definitely less ADHD than I was before I started to take stims. It's like the saying practice makes perfect.

It's like some people who are able to take meds for a short while then stop them when they are better enough. Then again I believe you have a valid point. I saw a website for ketamine therapy local to me that said there are some people who need to continue the treatment indefinitely.

 

Re: TMS = BS tom2228

Posted by Chris O on May 3, 2014, at 17:42:19

In reply to Re: TMS = BS Chris O, posted by tom2228 on May 3, 2014, at 9:43:53

Right, I get what you are saying. For some people, the "biological" part of their mental health issues can somehow be unlearned. I used to hope this was true for me (mainly in my 20s and early 30s), but now now the way 50, I hardly feel that way. I think my brain is "damaged" in some way and I don't think I can unlearn what is essentially my "core being" (as difficult as that is for me to acknowledge). At the same time, I totally get that anything that provides some type of significant relief for those of us suffering from profound anxiety and depression should be considered. I just think that the expensive price tag for TMS puts it out of reach for most.

 

Re: TMS = BS

Posted by Babbler20 on May 5, 2014, at 11:50:16

In reply to Re: TMS = BS tom2228, posted by Chris O on May 3, 2014, at 17:42:19

Unfortunately, all psychiatric treatments are BS ways of fattening doctors and insurance companies pockets. Some people switch into mania during antidepressant treatment and some people are just suggestible. That is the only reason for the alleged success of antidepressants. I've tried everything and nothing has helped.

 

Re: TMS = BS

Posted by SeekingSilverLining on May 12, 2014, at 13:05:15

In reply to TMS = BS, posted by babbler20 on May 2, 2014, at 15:14:48

I've had both TMS and ECT. Last summer I went through six weeks of TMS and by the third week I was feeling pretty damn good. I started gardening and felt more engaged in the world. The good feelings last half-way through the fall and then I started to fall apart. Late fall through spring is never a good time for me, but it was worse because I new how good I could feel and hadn't felt that good for more than a decade.

By January (after dysfunctional family circus holidays), I was so depressed, I went back to the TMS provider and he thought getting a second round would be a no-brainer. WRONG. My insurance denied me and gave me the runaround until my appeals ran out. My pdoc then started the ECT discussion which scared the heck out of me. By March I was waiting for a bed to start my treatment. I had 10 RUL Ultrabrief, six inpatient and four out. I stopped the treatments when I started having cognitive problem that are not tolerable when you're supposed to be job searching.

The problem with these treatment, even when they work, is that we should not expect a cure. The idea is to start to recover and then find a med that will keep us in remission long enough to get into real remission - which I've heard is six months symptom free. In my case that med is Emsam, but when combined with the other meds that I was already taking, is creating other problems that I hope the solve.

If TMS didn't work, it might be worth trying ECT. The approach is very conservative, and it's worth it if nothing else has worked. Best.

 

Re: TMS = BS SeekingSilverLining

Posted by Chris O on May 12, 2014, at 16:47:34

In reply to Re: TMS = BS, posted by SeekingSilverLining on May 12, 2014, at 13:05:15

Silver Lining:

That's some great feedback about TMS. It's pretty much the outcome I would expect if it works. My psychiatrist is going to get a TMS machine in his office in the next couple of months and I would like to try the treatment. He says he has been surprised by the outcome in several of his patients (he didn't expect much from it initially). But his go-to answer about how this can "reprogram" the brain for good is that it gives people a chance to learn new thinking and coping patterns, so they won't fall back into their old depression. In my case, I think it's way beyond that, some type of brain damage probably. Anyway, it still seems worth a try.

Chris

 

Re: TMS = BS

Posted by babbler20 on May 15, 2014, at 23:47:07

In reply to Re: TMS = BS, posted by SeekingSilverLining on May 12, 2014, at 13:05:15

Hi, I'm glad you at least experienced relief for a brief period of time. I'm afraid of getting ECT because I've been told by a couple doctors that people that have had multiple rounds of it are permanently a little off. I also don't have the luxury of being retarded, as I'm currently job searching as well.

 

'dysfunctional family circus holidays'--Brilliant! SeekingSilverLining

Posted by Chris O on May 16, 2014, at 4:29:13

In reply to Re: TMS = BS, posted by SeekingSilverLining on May 12, 2014, at 13:05:15

God, I love that line! And I so relate! I am still recovering from the "holidays" I had growing up with my family. My mom was a real charm. And she still thinks she is the bomb. Whatever.


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