Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1053947

Shown: posts 1 to 16 of 16. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

coreg

Posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 15:28:35

has any one ever been on this beta blocker

 

Re: coreg joef

Posted by SLS on November 7, 2013, at 15:59:24

In reply to coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 15:28:35

> has any one ever been on this beta blr was.

What specifically did you want to know?

Carvedilol (Coreg) is an unselective NE beta-blocker and an alpha-1 blocker that penetrates the blood brain barrier. The NE alpha-1 blockade acts as an afterload-reducer so that the heart doesn't have to work as hard. It is a good drug for congestive heart failure.

Are you looking to use Coreg for psychiatric purposes? Anxiety?


- Scott

 

Re: coreg

Posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 16:17:56

In reply to Re: coreg joef, posted by SLS on November 7, 2013, at 15:59:24

no -stents put in and was switched to it from metropolol as I felt that the metropol was causing shortness of breath.....but I would love if it helped a little with anxiety..your thoughts

 

Re: coreg joef

Posted by Phillipa on November 7, 2013, at 16:31:48

In reply to Re: coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 16:17:56

Joe prescribed by your heart doc? Does he/she know the other meds you are taking? Are you on a AD? Phillipa

 

Re: coreg joef

Posted by SLS on November 7, 2013, at 16:51:18

In reply to Re: coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 16:17:56

> no -stents put in and was switched to it from metropolol as I felt that the metropol was causing shortness of breath.....but I would love if it helped a little with anxiety..your thoughts

I have never heard of someone taking carvedilol (Coreg) specifically to treat anxiety, so I really can't be sure how effective it is. Let's put it this way - since Coreg makes its way into the brain, there is a chance that it would act to reduce certain types of anxiety similar to propranolol (Inderal).

Since you are a guinea pig of sorts, I look forward to your posting updates.


- Scott

 

Re: coreg

Posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 17:34:47

In reply to Re: coreg joef, posted by Phillipa on November 7, 2013, at 16:31:48

yes prescribed by heart dr...and knows other meds...it is a baby dose..3.125 twice daily

 

Re: coreg

Posted by ert on November 7, 2013, at 18:59:48

In reply to coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 15:28:35

> has any one ever been on this beta blocker

Coreg has antiproliferative effects on smooth muscle cells as well as some antioxidant effects (that's beneficial to "combat" plaques, the stuff that obstructs arteries), it has no ISA (at the same time beta blocking and stimulating effects), there is no negative effect on ldl lipids in contrast to metoprolol that elevates triglycerids,
it is not selective to beta1 receptors (thus does not slow down the heart rate as wells as metoprolol), much of its efficacy is due to his alpha1 receptor blockade it does penetrate the blood brain barrier like metoprolol (lipophil)

when taking metoprolol it makes sense also to follow a low fatty diet (no meat), better vegetables and 1/2 portion meal.

Regular measurements of the bloodpressure at different times (eg. evening and morning) makes sense.

all betablockers have side effects
maybe a try out and evaluation of its efficacy and tolerability makes sense. It's also good to evaluate if it works throughout the day (split the doses)

There are many beta blockers availabe... Coreg is more of an atypical one.

The blood pressure meds with the least side effects are the atII-Inhibitors.

 

Re: coreg

Posted by ert on November 7, 2013, at 19:11:46

In reply to coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 15:28:35

most "anxiety" studies were conducted with atenolol, propranolol, oxprenolol and nadolol.

Nadolol an unselective not so much blood brain barrier crossing betablocker has shown good results, its called the "Wagner" blocker because it works very long.
But this one is no more on the market in many countries, unfortunately because it was used as a long term protection for people with certain types of arrhythmia.

There is not much literature if Carvedilol is effective for anxiety (blocking adrenaline).

 

Re: coreg

Posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 19:42:47

In reply to Re: coreg, posted by ert on November 7, 2013, at 19:11:46

perhaps if it blocks adrenaline Cymbalta would not be the best choice as it produces adrenaline..although dr. says ok

 

Re: coreg joef

Posted by Phillipa on November 7, 2013, at 21:41:50

In reply to Re: coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 19:42:47

Joe I read an article earlier and it mentioned quite a few antidepressants with reguard to Coreg. Leg me see if can remember the search and post the link to you. Phillipa

 

Re: coreg joef

Posted by Phillipa on November 7, 2013, at 21:46:19

In reply to Re: coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 19:42:47

Joe the link will have to read pretty far down but medications to be careful of do include Cymbalta. Phillipa

http://www.drugs.com/coreg.html

 

Re: coreg

Posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 22:10:02

In reply to Re: coreg joef, posted by Phillipa on November 7, 2013, at 21:46:19

thank you ..it seems that maybe celexa or Lexapro might be safer.....although he was not worried about cymbalta

 

Re: coreg joef

Posted by vbs on November 8, 2013, at 16:25:48

In reply to coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 15:28:35

I currently take 12.5 mg twice a day for high blood pressure. No side effects.

 

Re: coreg vbs

Posted by former poster on November 9, 2013, at 0:03:51

In reply to Re: coreg joef, posted by vbs on November 8, 2013, at 16:25:48

I've been taking 37.5mg a day for about 15 years. I think it has the least side effects of any beta/alpha blocker. Prescribed by my cardiologist for aortic dialation. It calms me down and helps me sleep. E.D. side effects seem almost non-existent.

 

Re: coreg

Posted by joef on November 10, 2013, at 6:49:52

In reply to Re: coreg vbs, posted by former poster on November 9, 2013, at 0:03:51

interesting ...thanks for the response

 

Re: coreg

Posted by ed_uk2010 on November 11, 2013, at 15:45:40

In reply to Re: coreg, posted by joef on November 7, 2013, at 22:10:02

> thank you ..it seems that maybe celexa or Lexapro might be safer.....although he was not worried about cymbalta

Duloxetine (Cymbalta) can sometimes increase heart rate and occasionally BP. It is therefore not an ideal choice in pts with heart disease, but may be OK when combined with a beta blocker.

Citalopram (Celexa) and escitalopram (Lexapro) are rarely associated with cardiac arrhythmias. There are therefore not ideal in heart disease either.

Sertraline (Zoloft) is not generally associated with changes in heart rate, BP or cardiac rhythm. It has few drug interactions and is a good choice in pts with heart disease.

All SSRIs and SNRIs increase the risk of gastric bleeding when taken in combination with anti-platelets (especially multiple anti-platelets, as used in stent pts). Common anti-platelets are ASA (aspirin), clopidogrel (Plavix), ticagrelor (Brilinta) and prasugrel (Effient). When your doc does a CBC, a decrease in hemoglobin levels may be due to small amounts of blood being lost into the stomach over a period of time. Proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole (Prilosec) are sometimes prescribed to decrease the risk of gastric bleeding. Unfortunately, PPIs may decrease the effectiveness of clopidogrel (Plavix). As far as I know, PPIs do not interact with ASA, ticagrelor or prasugrel. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are more potent than clopidogrel however, and the bleeding risk is higher.

Hope this information is useful.



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