Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 976279

Shown: posts 1 to 25 of 33. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:05:12

It wasn't necessarily a New Year's resolution, but I decided (alone) to come off of sertraline. I had tried before, but the depression was too overwhelming and I always went back. I was on 50mg when I quit cold turkey, and for a week I've felt horrible. The anger and depression have lessened, but I still feel overwhelmed by loud sounds/ speech, bright lights, vivid and bizarre dreams, and (visual) changes in depth or distance. I am not really get any support from my family and I hate my regular physician and see someone else when I need a script or have a minor medical problem. Neither doctor seems to be very conversant in antidepressants, and the latter considers what I was on a "baby dose" and thinks I just need therapy. Yes, wonderful, of course I would except I have no insurance. I want to know if I am doing the right thing and how much longer I can expect withdrawal symptoms. I feel like either no one is treating this with any gravity or they think it's (as always) all in my head. Honestly, that bothers me more than the symptoms. Sorry for being so verbose, I just feel so alone and ignored.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:10:41

In reply to Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:05:12

Apologies again, I was down to 25mg as I was splitting the 50mg tabs in half.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by morgan miller on January 9, 2011, at 3:20:39

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:10:41

Why do you want to get off Zoloft? I'm sorry if you made this clear in your first post.

The way I see it, if you don't have any side effects that are impairing your ability to function normally in some aspects of life or are making you uncomfortable, there really is no reason to stop taking Zoloft. If it just flat out is not working anymore, that would be a good reason to. Thing is, Zoloft is a great drug. Not only does is help with depression and anxiety, but it does some other kinda cool things. It inhibits mTOR, which plays a role in cellular proliferation, a reason why it may help treat and prevent cancer and even extend lifespan. Zoloft also increases glutathione in the brain, which may help with cognitive decline associated with disease's like Huntington's.

The best thing you could do for yourself may be to stay on Zoloft at the dose that makes you feel your best and start seeing a very good therapist. Start taking steps to toward personal growth and life enrichment. Then you should consider getting off Zoloft. But, even if you go to therapy and start doing things that improve quality of life, and you find yourself feeling better about your life than ever, staying on Zoloft may be a good idea.

On the flipside, if you feel too numb on Zoloft and you feel it is impairing your ability to grow personally, that may be a reason to try to get off it. I still think you should stay on it for a while, maybe two or three more years, and start doing other things for yourself, before you consider getting off it.

Morgan

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by Phillipa on January 9, 2011, at 11:19:05

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:10:41

You remind me of myself as on luvox for about ll years. But it doesn't really work. If you say zoloft does don't go off it it might never work again or any other SSRI. Not saying to scare but once paxil l0mg worked for me a doc took me off and downhill since. And Morgan didn't know zoloft was a med that had positive effects. Thanks for the info. Phillipa

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 12:03:59

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine, posted by Phillipa on January 9, 2011, at 11:19:05

Oh, so sorry, I didn't realize this was a fan page for the pharmaceutical industry and lifelong dependency. Why do I want to come off Zoloft? Uh, I don't want to take drugs the rest of my life? I was put on it when I was 14 and no one seems to find it a problem that it was never stopped. And morgan's post might has well come from Pfizer itself. What a load of crap.

 

Lou's response-edu-ihnphoarmdkuncnt Sanguine

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 12:34:13

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 12:03:59

> Oh, so sorry, I didn't realize this was a fan page for the pharmaceutical industry and lifelong dependency. Why do I want to come off Zoloft? Uh, I don't want to take drugs the rest of my life? I was put on it when I was 14 and no one seems to find it a problem that it was never stopped. And morgan's post might has well come from Pfizer itself. What a load of crap.

Friends,
If you are considering being a discussant in this thread or parallel threads, I am requesting that you view the following videos. If you could, I think that th education presented could be helpful in constructing your post, if any.
Lou
To see this video,
A. pull up Google
B. Type in;
[youtube-part 9 0f 10 Psychiatry-making a with Dr. Rima]
Then after that, you could click on part 10 if seen or do the same search replacing part nine with part 10, if you like.

 

Lou's response-edu-psuesighd-17b

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 13:06:04

In reply to Lou's response-edu-ihnphoarmdkuncnt Sanguine, posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 12:34:13

Friends,
If you are considring to be a discussant in this thread or parallel threads, I am requesting that you view the following video. The education in the video I think could be helpful to those considering making a post here because of the stats that are presented.
Lou
To see this video,

http:www.feentv.com/view/g47vtpkb1/suicide-treatment]

 

correction- Lou's response-edu-psuesighd-17b

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 13:17:55

In reply to Lou's response-edu-psuesighd-17b, posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 13:06:04

> Friends,
> If you are considring to be a discussant in this thread or parallel threads, I am requesting that you view the following video. The education in the video I think could be helpful to those considering making a post here because of the stats that are presented.
> Lou
> To see this video,
>
> http:www.feentv.com/view/g47vtpkb1/suicide-treatment]

correction to see this video:
A. bring up Google
B. Type in,
[youtube, do psychiatric drugs actually prevent suicide]
There will be a picture of a man- the time is 7 min on May 10, 2007

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by Conundrum on January 9, 2011, at 13:51:57

In reply to Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:05:12

> It wasn't necessarily a New Year's resolution, but I decided (alone) to come off of sertraline. I had tried before, but the depression was too overwhelming and I always went back. I was on 50mg when I quit cold turkey, and for a week I've felt horrible. The anger and depression have lessened, but I still feel overwhelmed by loud sounds/ speech, bright lights, vivid and bizarre dreams, and (visual) changes in depth or distance. I am not really get any support from my family and I hate my regular physician and see someone else when I need a script or have a minor medical problem. Neither doctor seems to be very conversant in antidepressants, and the latter considers what I was on a "baby dose" and thinks I just need therapy. Yes, wonderful, of course I would except I have no insurance. I want to know if I am doing the right thing and how much longer I can expect withdrawal symptoms. I feel like either no one is treating this with any gravity or they think it's (as always) all in my head. Honestly, that bothers me more than the symptoms. Sorry for being so verbose, I just feel so alone and ignored.

This is as uncommon as you think. I would suggest you join paxilprogess.org or .com not sure, and talk to some of the members there who have gone through the same thing. I can tell you for sure that I notice changes in vision when starting or stopping SSRIs. It is almost as if things look two dimensional at times.

It can take a while for these things to go away. Some people end up going back on the drug and slowly weening down to stop these side effects.

You might experience problems with light and sound anywhere from 6 months up to 2 years. However you don't seem to be as bad as some of the folks who have come off SSRIS, so you would probably be better in a shorter time. Just know that it won't be an over night change.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by Conundrum on January 9, 2011, at 13:59:47

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 12:03:59

> Oh, so sorry, I didn't realize this was a fan page for the pharmaceutical industry and lifelong dependency. Why do I want to come off Zoloft? Uh, I don't want to take drugs the rest of my life? I was put on it when I was 14 and no one seems to find it a problem that it was never stopped. And morgan's post might has well come from Pfizer itself. What a load of crap.

There is no need to be rude to the members here. Many people here have suffered depression for years. I could understand that if you were put on a drug as a teen and now that those often turbulent years are over you might want to try to stop the zoloft. However, there are people here who have suffered with depression for years, and who will need to continue taking meds for the rest of their lives and there is nothing wrong with that. Would you recommend someone suffering suffering from psychotic delusions stop their meds? I highly doubt you would, so can you see why it sounds crazy to someone who has suffered for years with depression for someone to want to stop a drug that is making them not want to kill themselves. Also I don't think you need to take at what morgan said, I think he was just trying to offer useful advise.

Also zoloft is generic so I'm sure that Pfizer isn't wasting their time having people go on forums to promote the drug. You do often see that with newer drugs though, generally not on this forum, because it is so 1997.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 14:58:13

In reply to Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:05:12

Hi there,

>I want to know if I am doing the right thing......

Well, not really, no :) If you wish to stop sertraline after long term treatment, the correct way is to reduce gradually, not to stop abruptly. Since you are still experiencing very unpleasant symptoms, the best course of action would be to restart sertraline at a dose sufficient to block withdrawal symptoms. I would recommend 25mg per day initially. If this is not sufficient to relieve your symptoms, you could try 37.5mg per day, then 50mg if necessary.

Once you have established a dose which prevents withdrawal symptoms, you can start to reduce gradually over a period of several months (often about three months, but variable and individual). There is absolutely no reason to rush this process, it should be gradual and pain free. If you are experiencing unpleasant withdrawal symptoms you are going too fast. The withdrawal should not be unpleasant, and there is no benefit whatsoever in making it unpleasant by reducing too quickly.

When reducing, sertraline should still be taken every day, do not skip days or do 'alternate day dosing'. What you need to do is gradually reduce your daily dose. If you live in the US, 25mg sertraline tablets are available and should be helpful in allowing you to reduce gradually. You can cut the tablets into pieces as necessary. If your tablet halves, quarters (or whatever) are not exact, it does not matter. The aim is only to reduce slowly, not to take a precise dose. When reducing, avoid decreasing the dose more than once a week.

Whilst reducing, be aware of what type of symptoms you are experiencing. Bizarre dreams and changes to hearing and vision are clearly withdrawal symptoms, not symptoms of depression. Withdrawal symptoms can be dealt with by reducing more slowly. On the other hand, if you experience substantial depressive symptoms in the absence of withdrawal symptoms, this could be a sign of a relapse into depression. If you start to experience a relapse, I would recommend increasing back up to 50mg and abandoning the withdrawal process (at least for the time being).

As a side note, 50mg of sertraline is not a 'baby dose', it is the standard therapeutic dose for the treatment of depression, as recommended by the manufacturer. Certainly, higher doses are widely used, but 50mg is very much a therapeutic dose with clear pharmacological effects. The withdrawal symptoms from 50mg are the same as from higher doses.

My main advise is to be sensible. You current strategy has made you ill, which is a clear sign that it wasn't the right thing to do. Rapid withdrawal has made you feel so bad that you are left with no idea whether you actually require continuing antidepressant treatment or not. A gradual tapering process will allow you to discover whether you still need sertraline, and if so, what the lowest effective dose will be.

Best of luck with whatever you decide to do.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 15:01:22

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:10:41

> Apologies again, I was down to 25mg as I was splitting the 50mg tabs in half.

Sorry, I just read this.

First of all, you need to get a prescription for the 25mg tablets. You can then restart treatment at 25mg then initiate the tapering process.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years ed_uk2010

Posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 15:12:23

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine, posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 14:58:13

Thank you for the informed response. I had no intention of discrediting the use of meds or bashing people for whom they have been beneficial and even lifesaving, as they have helped with my depression and anxiety, I was only annoyed that the responses didn't seem to address any negative issues with (the) medication and the first response seemed close to touting sertraline as a panacea on par with taking a daily multivitamin. I am slightly more critical as I was put on Lithium when I was younger and still believe it was a grave error by an overzealous psychiatrist. I apologize to those I offended.

 

Lou's request-edu-skulchutngs-15d

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 15:13:44

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine, posted by Conundrum on January 9, 2011, at 13:59:47

Friends,
If you are considering being a discussant in this thread, I am requesting that you view the following video. If you could, I think that the education in the video could be helpful in relation to the question as to if taking antidepressants prevents suicide or could cause violence , murder and/or suicide.
Lou
To view this video,
A. bring uup Google.
B. Type in;
[youtube, Can antidepressants cause violence]
There will be a picture of a woman and the time is 10 min on May 8, 2007

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 15:19:26

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 12:03:59

>Oh, so sorry, I didn't realize this was a fan page for the pharmaceutical industry...

It isn't, there are people here with all sorts of views regarding medication.

>Why do I want to come off Zoloft? Uh, I don't want to take drugs the rest of my life?

Well, it all depends on whether you still need it. Abrupt withdrawal causes illness in itself and therefore prevents you from finding out whether you still need the medication. Very gradual withdrawal serves to prevent unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. This way, you can find out whether you still require sertraline for its effects against anxiety and depression. You can monitor yourself for symptoms of depression during the gradual reduction because you are not overwhelmed by withdrawal symptoms, as occur during a rapid withdrawal.

>no one seems to find it a problem that it was never stopped

I guess this is because long term use of antidepressants is so commonplace. I hope you don't feel that you've been harmed by sertraline, but I do sense your anger. The final reduction from 25mg to 0mg needs to occur more gradually then any other stage of withdrawal. I know it can be difficult to cut the tablets up but it is something that has to be done. Just don't worry about it being too precise. Initially, I would go back on 25mg, then you could try 3/4 of a 25mg tablet for a couple of weeks and go from there.

>And Morgan's post might has well come from Pfizer itself. What a load of crap.

Please be respectful to the views of others. Morgan has a right to his own opinions, as we all do. As far as I am aware, his personal experience with sertraline has been very positive. There are people here with all sorts of different problems, and many different beliefs about how they should be dealt with.

Best regards.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 15:23:11

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years ed_uk2010, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 15:12:23

> Thank you for the informed response.

You're welcome.

>I apologize to those I offended.

That's good of you to say so. I just responded to your post to Morgan in my previous post, but I hadn't read your apology.

 

Re: Lou's response-edu-psuesighd-17b Lou Pilder

Posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 15:26:42

In reply to Lou's response-edu-psuesighd-17b, posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 13:06:04

Lou, the original poster has asked for assistance with withdrawal from sertraline, he has not asked to become part of an anti-psychiatry campaign.

Antidepressants can cause problems but they can also be beneficial. It's important to retain a balanced viewpoint.

 

Lou's request-edu-krmphrd-14c

Posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 15:50:40

In reply to Lou's request-edu-skulchutngs-15d, posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 15:13:44

Friends,
If you are considering being a discussant in this thread, I am requesting that you view the following video. If you could, I think that the informatgion could be educational in regard to you having more information so that you could make a more informed decision as to taking the drugs or not.
Lou
To see this video,
A. pull up Google
B. Type in,
[youtube,Dangers of antidepressants supressed (Fox News)]
There will be a picture of bottles...the time is 5 min on Jan 20, 2008

 

Re: Lou's request-edu-krmphrd-14c Lou Pilder

Posted by ed_uk2010 on January 9, 2011, at 17:38:32

In reply to Lou's request-edu-krmphrd-14c, posted by Lou Pilder on January 9, 2011, at 15:50:40

>you could make a more informed decision as to taking the drugs or not.

Give it a rest Lou. This thread is about how to taper off sertraline, it's not about anti-med propaganda.


 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by roscopeeco on January 9, 2011, at 19:30:09

In reply to Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:05:12

No offense man but you were on zoloft for fifteen years at one of the smallest doses and you were obviously getting great relief from it. You decided that you don't want to be dependent on a med and you quit cold turkey after fifteen years. Now you are going through withdrawal symptoms and want help.

Meanwhile, there are people on here that would love to take 50mgs of zoloft the rest of their life and be completely normal.

Your side effects are because you quit cold turkey. You want my advice? Taper off the medication as long as it takes to avoid side effects. There is a liquid concentrate of zoloft that you can get to taper off your small dose. I hope you put some hard thoughts in coming off this medication. If it provides you with relief you might not get the same response two years from now if your depression happens to return.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by morgan miller on January 9, 2011, at 20:54:33

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 12:03:59

> Oh, so sorry, I didn't realize this was a fan page for the pharmaceutical industry and lifelong dependency. Why do I want to come off Zoloft? Uh, I don't want to take drugs the rest of my life? I was put on it when I was 14 and no one seems to find it a problem that it was never stopped. And morgan's post might has well come from Pfizer itself. What a load of crap.

I understand you were put on drugs at a young age and it was not your choice. I'm not for putting children or teens on medication, though I understand it may be a necessary evil in some cases. I guess I just though that if you didn't have any negative side effects, and you felt good and functioned at a high level, the potential for suffering may not be worth taking the risk of getting off Zoloft, especially if you have not gone to therapy first.

I came off medication a few times in my life. After years of experience and some research, I realized that major episodes of depression and anxiety can potentially do much more damage to one's life and one's mind than medications can do in many instances.

Now that I think about it, maybe I should not have let my experience and bias influence my response to your post.

I'm not sure if you read my post carefully enough though, if you had, you would have realized I was saying to make some other changes in your life before getting off medication first. I believe that is some fairly sound advice.

One other concern I have is that people often get off medication, fall back into a bad state, and try the medication again only to find it does not work as well as it did when they got off it.

I say go for it. Do what you can to be medication free. Research supplements you can take. Start exercising religiously. Get into Meditation. Start doing meditative yoga. Find a really good therapist. And hope for the best.

I really do think it is possible that you could live a medication free life, it just might be a difficult long road to get there. If you do end up happy and medication free, I will be the first one to congratulate you and wish you well.

So good luck on in achieving your goals. I say that with all sincerity.

Morgan

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by morgan miller on January 9, 2011, at 21:09:47

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years ed_uk2010, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 15:12:23

> Thank you for the informed response. I had no intention of discrediting the use of meds or bashing people for whom they have been beneficial and even lifesaving, as they have helped with my depression and anxiety, I was only annoyed that the responses didn't seem to address any negative issues with (the) medication and the first response seemed close to touting sertraline as a panacea on par with taking a daily multivitamin. I am slightly more critical as I was put on Lithium when I was younger and still believe it was a grave error by an overzealous psychiatrist. I apologize to those I offended.

Ed gave you some good tapering advice.

I think I was just trying to give you some positive information about sertraline so you might not feel as bad about being on it, especially if you were to find yourself needing to stay on it. You made me laugh with multivitamin panacea comment : )

>I am slightly more critical as I was put on Lithium when I was younger and still believe it was a grave error by an overzealous psychiatrist.

Lithium probably didn't alter you or damage you in any permanent way. I guessing maybe it did make you feel bad in some ways and this is the reason for some of your resentment. Anyway, I totally understand why you would be frustrated and angry about being put on medications so early in life. I was lucky I guess in that I "chose" to be on medication starting in my lower 20s. You may not want to hear this, but it's likely that your anger is misguided and is mainly harbored toward your parents. The development of mental illness is usually a result of the combination of both lack of nurture by the parent and a genetic predisposition, not just one or the other.

Again good luck and I'm sorry that my first post frustrated you without addressing your needs here.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 23:12:21

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by roscopeeco on January 9, 2011, at 19:30:09

> No offense man but you were on zoloft for fifteen years at one of the smallest doses and you were obviously getting great relief from it. You decided that you don't want to be dependent on a med and you quit cold turkey after fifteen years. Now you are going through withdrawal symptoms and want help.

>
>
I never said I was at 50mg for 15 years, I was at 150mg for many years and have reduced it most recently splitting a 50 in half and honestly didn't expect such extreme withdrawal symptoms stopping a 25mg dose cold turkey. Thanks.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years Sanguine

Posted by morgan miller on January 9, 2011, at 23:30:28

In reply to Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 23:12:21

I respect your effort to be medication free. I often wonder why some people go through so much worse withdrawals than others. I suspect in your case it may have something to getting on medication at a young age, being on an above average dose, and the length of time you were on the medication. And, of course, it also has much to do with your individual brain chemistry.

I really do hope you are able to get off medication and live free of it without any major issues. I really do wish I could be medication free and I'm sure most here at babble do as well. I've successfully stopped medication with a fair amount of ease in the past. The only problem was that I was bipolar and always fell back into a bad place. In a different world with a different upbringing and maybe some earlier intervention with therapy, I may have made it through long periods of my adulthood without medication.

 

Re: Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years

Posted by bleauberry on January 10, 2011, at 11:48:03

In reply to Quitting Zoloft After 15+ Years, posted by Sanguine on January 9, 2011, at 1:05:12

> It wasn't necessarily a New Year's resolution, but I decided (alone) to come off of sertraline. I had tried before, but the depression was too overwhelming and I always went back. I was on 50mg when I quit cold turkey, and for a week I've felt horrible. The anger and depression have lessened, but I still feel overwhelmed by loud sounds/ speech, bright lights, vivid and bizarre dreams, and (visual) changes in depth or distance. I am not really get any support from my family and I hate my regular physician and see someone else when I need a script or have a minor medical problem. Neither doctor seems to be very conversant in antidepressants, and the latter considers what I was on a "baby dose" and thinks I just need therapy. Yes, wonderful, of course I would except I have no insurance. I want to know if I am doing the right thing and how much longer I can expect withdrawal symptoms. I feel like either no one is treating this with any gravity or they think it's (as always) all in my head. Honestly, that bothers me more than the symptoms. Sorry for being so verbose, I just feel so alone and ignored.


A baby dose is more like 6mg or 12.5mg, by splitting pills.

In my eperience, it will take a long time for the brain and the entire body to settle into a baseline pattern in the absence of the zoloft molecule. 15 years is a long time.

Eight years on prozac. Took a couple months to wean down to 0mg, about 3 months for all withdrawals to be gone, and another 3 to 6 months to stabilize into a new baseline.

To do it better would involve getting back on zoloft and slowly decreasing the dose in tiny steps over about a 2 to 3 month period. You would have to cut and sliver pills to do it right.

Following just 3 months on zoloft it took about 6 weeks for my withdrawals to be gone.

Life without zoloft might be more lousy than with, so keep that in mind. If you were doing well before you stopped it, I see no reason to stop it at all. If it wasn't working, that's a different story. In that case the simple addition of Nortriptyline low dose would have been a great maneuver. IMO.



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