Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 753698

Shown: posts 1 to 10 of 10. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

depression psychological

Posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

went to see my psychotherapist today and did not feel it was at all productive.
She seems to pick on every word i say. Told me that 'i will change when i want to /am ready to' and that i seem triumphant that i am thinking about giving up the nardil because of sideeffects because it means i will remain depressed. Also told me that the way i put myself down and am scared of any one in authority who upsets is the reason why i remain depressed.
i felt really upset with the way she spoke to me. I don't know what to believe anymore. I don't feel as if i am making excuses which keep me depressed. i don't want to feel like this anymore. I tried to explain to her that i have always been suffering low selfesteem and suffered from rejection sensitivity and that i feel it is biochemical. As much CBT as i have tried it never works. Its hard to change such an innate sense of misery,
What do you think? Do you feel depression should be treated with medicatcions or do you believe in this theory that we are depressed because unconsciously we do not want to help ourselves?

 

Re: depression psychological jenny80

Posted by Phillipa on April 26, 2007, at 15:57:07

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

I would hate to think that. So that's what she implied? Let's see what others say. Love Phillipa

 

Re: depression psychological jenny80

Posted by jealibeanz on April 26, 2007, at 18:56:32

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

If she makes you feel that way, plus the medications aren't helping, you don't need to keep seeing her.

Maybe medications will work. Maybe CBT will work... but she doesn't seem to be making you feel any better.

 

Re: depression psychological

Posted by Johann on April 27, 2007, at 1:21:07

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

A few things from my perspective as a psychologist:

If you are representing your therapist accurately, she doesn't seem very compassionate or respectfu--more about control.

Depression is never only biochemical or psychological, and being a mix of some degree, when severe it requires medication and therapy.

CBT can help with milder depressions, or with coping, but more insight/psychodynamically oriented approaches are best for core change.

Your pain is obviously real and long term, and you should be treated with honor. Maybe both your medication and therapy are having intolerable side effects.

It doesn't have to be so hard.


> went to see my psychotherapist today and did not feel it was at all productive.
> She seems to pick on every word i say. Told me that 'i will change when i want to /am ready to' and that i seem triumphant that i am thinking about giving up the nardil because of sideeffects because it means i will remain depressed. Also told me that the way i put myself down and am scared of any one in authority who upsets is the reason why i remain depressed.
> i felt really upset with the way she spoke to me. I don't know what to believe anymore. I don't feel as if i am making excuses which keep me depressed. i don't want to feel like this anymore. I tried to explain to her that i have always been suffering low selfesteem and suffered from rejection sensitivity and that i feel it is biochemical. As much CBT as i have tried it never works. Its hard to change such an innate sense of misery,
> What do you think? Do you feel depression should be treated with medicatcions or do you believe in this theory that we are depressed because unconsciously we do not want to help ourselves?

 

Re: depression psychological

Posted by peddidle on April 27, 2007, at 16:43:33

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

Interesting topic...

I don't have an answer, but I can share something that happened during my session yesterday.

My T asked me if I was afraid of feeling better. She didn't ask it in a condescending manner or anything-- it sounded just like any other question she's asked, but it still felt like it hit me right in the heart, if that makes any sense. I don't really remember exactly what I said, but I think I just told her that I didn't know.

Why would someone be afraid of feeling better? That would be pretty silly, wouldn't it?

 

Re: depression psychological jenny80

Posted by Racer on April 28, 2007, at 21:07:35

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

>
> What do you think? Do you feel depression should be treated with medicatcions or do you believe in this theory that we are depressed because unconsciously we do not want to help ourselves?

I agree with Johann -- it's both. There is a genetic vulnerability, which can be triggered by life events and habits of thought. Or as someone much better with words than I am put it: "genes load the gun, environment pulls the trigger."

It doesn't sound to me as though you and your T have a lot of trust built up? What do you think? Is this a good fit for you? Do you get something out of this therapy? Sometimes a therapist can be good, and good for us for a time, but then we need to move on to someone who'll take us to a slightly different place on our journey.

I agree with Johann, too, about psychodynamic...

Good luck.

 

Consider changing pdocs (nm) jenny80

Posted by UgottaHaveHope on April 28, 2007, at 22:40:08

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

 

Re: depression psychological peddidle

Posted by Honore on April 30, 2007, at 10:22:11

In reply to Re: depression psychological, posted by peddidle on April 27, 2007, at 16:43:33

There are definitely reasons why we might be afraid of feeling better. My T thinks I'm afraid to. But I have reasons to be afraid-- mostly in the circumstances of my childhood (and adulthood, for that matter, since I reenact childhood scenarios now).

For one thing, if you have a parent who feels like a failure, or who has a sense of deprivation or loss, and who feels a lot of pain when someone else has something good, or accomplishes something good-- or feels good about themselves-- even if the parent is trying to support you overtly-- you can feel that your success or good sense of yourself is hurtful or destructive for your parent. In my case, at least, that's a huge factor in my resistance to and fear of feeling better. It's something that was always destructive of one of my parents' very fragile and unhappy sense of self. And that can be an incredibly important motive for a child-- to keep a parent afloat as best as possible--ie by making sure that you never have things-ie good feelings about yourself-- that cause the parent to feel bad about themselves.

That's one reason, but I'm sure there are others.

Honore

 

Re: depression psychological jenny80

Posted by Declan on April 30, 2007, at 16:20:05

In reply to depression psychological, posted by jenny80 on April 26, 2007, at 15:03:33

I suppose it would do no good to give your T a very direct look and say
"What makes you think I should be happy? Just some identification with the dominant culture?"

Would that make for a lively chat?

 

Re: depression psychological

Posted by Ines on May 2, 2007, at 15:03:17

In reply to Re: depression psychological jenny80, posted by Declan on April 30, 2007, at 16:20:05

Declan, I think the issue there is that Jenny wants to be happy. Certainly most people aren't unhappy enough that they do not feel their life is worth it, that can't be common. I would see that as a big difference between a person who is just negative or apathic- but stills gets some sense of worth from their life- and a depressed person who suffers from the way they feel. I'd say that would distinguish depression from a personality issue- how you feel about it and whether you desperately want to change it. Just a though.


This is the end of the thread.


Show another thread

URL of post in thread:


Psycho-Babble Medication | Extras | FAQ


[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

Script revised: February 4, 2008
URL: http://www.dr-bob.org/cgi-bin/pb/mget.pl
Copyright 2006-17 Robert Hsiung.
Owned and operated by Dr. Bob LLC and not the University of Chicago.