Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 480333

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Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi

Posted by jerrympls on April 5, 2005, at 20:47:31

In reply to Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 5, 2005, at 17:54:31

You eventually grow a tolerance to the weight reducing effects. For me it took a year. But I did lose a lot of weight quickly while on it.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Paulbwell on April 5, 2005, at 21:13:58

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi, posted by jerrympls on April 5, 2005, at 20:47:31

HAHA

This is not 1956

HEHE

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Paulbwell

Posted by Maxime on April 5, 2005, at 22:36:03

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Paulbwell on April 5, 2005, at 21:13:58

> HAHA
>
> This is not 1956
>
> HEHE

Can you let us in on the joke?

Maxime

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by adhdgina on April 5, 2005, at 22:39:17

In reply to Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 5, 2005, at 17:54:31

> can Dexedrine make you lose weight even after taking it for a while?

I haven't lost any! what's my problem? I wish I could...

 

Re: please be civil Paulbwell

Posted by Dr. Bob on April 6, 2005, at 0:16:58

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Paulbwell on April 5, 2005, at 21:13:58

> HAHA
>
> This is not 1956
>
> HEHE

Please be sensitive to the feelings of others.

If you or others have questions about this or about posting policies in general, or are interested in alternative ways of expressing yourself, please see the FAQ:

http://www.dr-bob.org/babble/faq.html#civil

Follow-ups regarding these issues should be redirected to Psycho-Babble Administration. They, as well as replies to the above post, should of course themselves be civil.

Thanks,

Bob

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Maxime

Posted by Sarah T. on April 6, 2005, at 0:35:18

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Paulbwell, posted by Maxime on April 5, 2005, at 22:36:03

> > > > Can you let us in on the joke?
> > Maxime

Hi Maxime. I guess I shouldn't try to speak for paulbwell, but I think he might be referring to some drug company advertisements that used to appear in medical journals back in the '50's. On several occasions, some people have posted those advertisements here on PB. If I ever come across those links, I'll let you know. Back in the dark ages of the 1950's, dexedrine was used as an antidepressant and as a weight loss drug. Most of the ads were very obviously directed at traditional housewives of that era. The ads even featured these women vacuuming and doing other types of housework. Underneath the photographs, the ads would mention something like, "She'd be much more productive with her housework if she were on dexedrine." [In other words, doctor, if you'd prescribe amphetamines to your female patients, they'd make much better wives and mothers. And, after all, isn't that what women are for?] Some of the old Saturday Night Live skits, from the 1970's, parodied those housewives of the 1950's and 60's, who even referred to their dexedrine as "mother's little helper."

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Sarah T.

Posted by Maxime on April 6, 2005, at 16:18:39

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Maxime, posted by Sarah T. on April 6, 2005, at 0:35:18

Ah yea! I DO remember now! I remember the SNL skits.

Thanks!

Maxime

> > > > > Can you let us in on the joke?
> > > Maxime
>
> Hi Maxime. I guess I shouldn't try to speak for paulbwell, but I think he might be referring to some drug company advertisements that used to appear in medical journals back in the '50's. On several occasions, some people have posted those advertisements here on PB. If I ever come across those links, I'll let you know. Back in the dark ages of the 1950's, dexedrine was used as an antidepressant and as a weight loss drug. Most of the ads were very obviously directed at traditional housewives of that era. The ads even featured these women vacuuming and doing other types of housework. Underneath the photographs, the ads would mention something like, "She'd be much more productive with her housework if she were on dexedrine." [In other words, doctor, if you'd prescribe amphetamines to your female patients, they'd make much better wives and mothers. And, after all, isn't that what women are for?] Some of the old Saturday Night Live skits, from the 1970's, parodied those housewives of the 1950's and 60's, who even referred to their dexedrine as "mother's little helper."

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 17:17:35

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Sarah T., posted by Maxime on April 6, 2005, at 16:18:39

Thanks for the information. I was worried because I have a very high metabolism and really do not need to lose weight.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 20:31:45

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 17:17:35

Forgive me for ignorance, but what is Dexedrine and what medical conditions is it prescribed for?

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 20:37:04

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 20:31:45

> Forgive me for ignorance, but what is Dexedrine and what medical conditions is it prescribed for?

it is used for ADHD and in some cases narcolepsy. It helps people with ADHD focus and to become more task oriented.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 20:38:07

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 20:31:45

> Forgive me for ignorance, but what is Dexedrine and what medical conditions is it prescribed for?

it is used for ADHD and in some cases narcolepsy. It helps people with ADHD focus and to become more task oriented.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 20:43:30

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 20:38:07

I have to take Nortriptyline for migraines, but it makes me gain weight. Would Dexedrine be a harmful addition? I do not have ADHD.

Thanks.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 20:47:20

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 20:43:30

> I have to take Nortriptyline for migraines, but it makes me gain weight. Would Dexedrine be a harmful addition? I do not have ADHD.
>
> Thanks.

I have no idea.....

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Interested

Posted by Maxime on April 6, 2005, at 21:05:33

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 20:43:30

> I have to take Nortriptyline for migraines, but it makes me gain weight. Would Dexedrine be a harmful addition? I do not have ADHD.
>
> Thanks.

It would not be a good idea and I doubt you would get a doctor to agree to it (at least I hope no one would). A lot of people who gain weight from psych meds take Topomax which decreases your appetite and is actually used to treat migraines so it might be something to investigate.

Maxime

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Maxime

Posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 21:09:18

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Interested, posted by Maxime on April 6, 2005, at 21:05:33

Thanks, Maxime. Coincidentally, I was just reading about Topomax on another thread, and I think I'm going to ask my neuro about it.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 21:12:12

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Maxime, posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 21:09:18

> Thanks, Maxime. Coincidentally, I was just reading about Topomax on another thread, and I think I'm going to ask my neuro about it.

What about adderall? Is that better than Dexedrine?

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi

Posted by Interested on April 7, 2005, at 8:06:17

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 6, 2005, at 21:12:12

What is adderall, and what is it usually prescribed for?

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Interested

Posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 14:09:50

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Maxime, posted by Interested on April 6, 2005, at 21:09:18

> Thanks, Maxime. Coincidentally, I was just reading about Topomax on another thread, and I think I'm going to ask my neuro about it.

I think I just saw an article about it on Medscape. If I can find it I will post it to you, or if you have your babble-mail turned on I will send it to you that way.

Maxime

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Interested

Posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 14:13:24

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi, posted by Interested on April 7, 2005, at 8:06:17

> What is adderall, and what is it usually prescribed for?

Adderall is also a stimulant. Is is a mixture of "salts". In my opinion it is better than Dexedrine for it's intended use (ADD or Depression) because it didn't make me crash the way Dexedrine does.

But again, no doctor is going to prescribe to you so you can lose weight. And it would probably make your headaches worse.

I really think Topomax might be the answer because it will help with the weight lose and the migraines. :-)

Maxime

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 7, 2005, at 18:01:30

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Interested, posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 14:13:24

Is adderall a short acting stimulant? My M.D. says the Dexedrine 15mg I am prescribed is long acting.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi

Posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 19:22:46

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 7, 2005, at 18:01:30

> Is adderall a short acting stimulant? My M.D. says the Dexedrine 15mg I am prescribed is long acting.

Adderall XR is long acting - 12 hours. There is also regular Adderall. I don't know how much Adderall you would need to be equivalent of the Dexedrine long acting, but I am sure your doctor can look it up somewhere.

Maxime

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 7, 2005, at 19:28:55

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi, posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 19:22:46

Thank-you. I get so confused with the XR and short acting. Do you know which is better. Right now I take 15 mg Dexedrine. my M.D. suggested Adderall because it works right away. It takes soem time with Dexedrine. Some days I will feel focused and task oriented and other days I don't

 

Re: For Interested

Posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 20:48:26

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Interested, posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 14:13:24

Interested, here is the article I was talking about.

Maxime


Anti-epileptic Reduces Migraines, Weight

Medscape Medical News 2003. 2003 Medscape

Larry Schuster

April 4, 2003 (Honolulu) In the largest trials of prophylactic use of a drug for migraine prevention, the anti-epileptic topiramate (Topamax) reduced the number of monthly migraine episodes by nearly 50%, and in contrast to other migraine drugs caused up to 5% weight loss.

In two parallel, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies involving a total of about 1,000 patients, the results were nearly the same in both studies on all key measures. Both studies were released here at the American Academy of Neurology 55th annual meeting.

In the study known as MIGR-002, which involved 483 patients, Jan Brandes, MD, from the Nashville Neuroscience Center in Tennessee, reported in a poster presentation that as early as one month into treatment, the average number of migraines was reduced by half for 49% of patients receiving topiramate at either 100 or 200 mg per day and 39% of patients taking 50 mg per day.

The mean number of migraines decreased from 5.8 to 3.5 per month for patients receiving 100 mg of topiramate (P= .008) and from 5.1 to 2.9 for patients receiving 200 mg (P = .001) compared with a decrease from 5.6 to 4.5 for those receiving placebo. Patients also experienced significant weight loss: 2.4%, 3.5%, and 4.75% for those receiving 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg per day, respectively (P = .001 for all).

No deaths occurred and no serious adverse events were considered by the study investigators to be related to topiramate. The most common adverse effects for withdrawing from the study were parasthesia, fatigue, nausea, and abdominal pain.

In the MIGR-001 study, reported by Ninan Mathew, MD, from the Houston Headache Clinic in Texas, the efficacy was similar. The most common adverse events resulting in discontinuation included parasthesia, anxiety, difficulty sleeping, and hypoesthesia.

In a phone interview with Medscape, Dr. Brandes said they "had more patients in the [topiramate] trials than any other drug that's been used for prevention. Most of the trials of those that have received [Food and Drug Administration] (FDA) approval have had as few as 96 patients."

The other three drugs on the market for migraine prevention are two hypertension medications, propranolol (Inderal) and timolol (Blocadren), and an anticonvulsant, divalproex (Depakote). Topiramate entered the market for epilepsy in 1997.

Part of the mechanism that causes migraine is that the gray matter is more excitable, Dr. Brandes said. "This hyperexcitability can be moderated by drugs classified [as] antiepileptics. They act as a neuromodulator in patients who have migraine."

Ideal candidates for the drug are people who have at least three or four disabling migraine episodes a month, he said. The drug also appears to reduce the severity of the remaining migraines, which then can be treated with acute therapy, preferably by one of the triptans.

"One of the most exciting things is the effect on weight loss," Dr. Brandes said of topiramate. "That's a very significant advantage for this drug."

Weight gain can be a huge problem with some migraine drugs, such as tricyclic antidepressants.

The weight-loss benefit of topiramate is particularly important, he noted, if the patient is above the normal weight body mass index and additional weight gain would put the patient at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. The issue is especially important for those who already have diabetes.

The most common adverse effect in the MIGR-002 study was parasthesis, which Dr. Brandes called benign and which usually resolves. Researchers advised doctors to tell their patients that this is a normal and transient effect of the drug. In addition, patients should be advised not to go for long periods without food. Tell them, Dr. Brandes said, to "remember to eat carefully."

Also, the drug can make anything carbonated taste odd. Not everyone will have that adverse effect, but if so, that might be an indication to adjust the dosage. One advantage of that adverse effect is that it may help patients decrease their intake of caffeinated carbonated beverages. Overuse of caffeine, Dr. Brandes said, may result in rebound headaches.

"The real concern are the cognitive side effects," said Dr. Rothrock, who noted the effect seems dose-dependent. Problems with memory and finding words show up in about 15% of patients receiving 200 mg, 10% of those receiving 100 mg, 8% of those receiving 50 mg, and 4% of those who received placebo.

To minimize that effect, the researchers advised physicians to start their patients at low doses, perhaps even less than 50 mg a day, and slowly increase the dose. For some patients, 50 mg may be enough, although for most patients, the target dose might be 100 mg.

Physicians also need to be aware of patients' history regarding renal stones and glaucoma, both rare adverse effects that have been reported with this drug, Dr. Brandes said. She advised physicians to have patients treated for any disposition to develop stones prior to placing them on the drug. At the least, patients should be monitoring for this and report any discomfort as it happens, she said.

Dr. Brandes does not place patients on the drug who have glaucoma, but she noted that no patient of hers developed glaucoma while receiving topiramate, and the type of glaucoma that might come from its use would be resolved upon stopping the drug.

But whether a patient's migraines are more likely to be prevented by topiramate or divalproate, for example, can only be determined by patient experience, Drs. Rothrock and Brandes told Medscape. With both drugs, about 50% of patients respond.

"We just don't know," Dr. Rothrock said. So far, there have been no head-to-head trials that might answer that question.

Although older anticonvulsive drugs that were used for migraine interfered with birth control pills and caused bone loss, this has not been found with topiramate, Dr. Brandes said. Dr. Rothrock said he also has not seen "breakthrough pregnancy" due to interference by the drug with birth control drugs, but "it remains a theoretical possibility," he said.

The researchers also noted that the drug began working within the first four weeks, while some drugs tend to take longer to have an effect.

Suzanne Simons, executive director of the National Headache Association in Chicago, Illinois, told Medscape that with these positive results, "You now have another medication to offer patients," and the drug represents another opportunity for the prevention of migraines.

Drs. Brandes, Rothrock, and Mathew's research was supported by Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development.

AAN 55th Annual Meeting: Abstracts PO3.155, PO3.156, S42.001. Presented April 2, 2003.

Reviewed by Gary D. Vogin, MD

Larry Schuster is a freelance writer for Medscape.

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi

Posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 20:54:07

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?, posted by Vivi on April 7, 2005, at 19:28:55

> Thank-you. I get so confused with the XR and short acting. Do you know which is better. Right now I take 15 mg Dexedrine. my M.D. suggested Adderall because it works right away. It takes soem time with Dexedrine. Some days I will feel focused and task oriented and other days I don't

The Adderall XR kicks in right away. I never used the regular Adderall because it was never available in Canada. Now the XR isn't available anymore. Some people take the XR and then use the regular Adderall in the afternoon if they feel it's losing its effect.

I'm sure that with Adderall you will have good days and bad days as well. But for me it was the fact that I didn't crash on the Adderall XR. I noticed it's effect had gone in the evening but I didn't have crying spells or irritability the way I do with Ritalin and Dexedrine.

You might as well try it and if you don't like it you can go back to dexedrine. :-)

Maxime

 

Re: Dexedrine to lose weight?

Posted by Vivi on April 7, 2005, at 20:58:41

In reply to Re: Dexedrine to lose weight? Vivi, posted by Maxime on April 7, 2005, at 20:54:07

I am supposed to meet with my M.D. next week and discuss switching from Dexedrine to adderall. i tried Ritalin, but that made em have too many mood swings. Dexedrine has been starting to take my appetite. Does Adderall do the same? Whats the Generic for that? I took the generic for Dexedrine-Dextroamphetamine.
Oh by the way, are you familiar with Ambien? I take it for sleep and really need it after taking the Dexedrine.
Thanks for all your help,
Viv


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