Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 256402

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Dex and skin effects over time.

Posted by Zenclearer on September 2, 2003, at 17:29:55

Calling all middle-aged dex users (or I suppose any amphetamine):

Have you noticed any long-term effects of dex use on your skin? Such as wrinkling (the way cigarette-smokers have more aged skin, due to reduced blood flow on skin surface).

Also, when you lower or stop your dex, do you get really dry skin at first? I do. I think it's an effect related to overall disruption of metabolism and/or hormone levels.

I read an interesting study recently speculating that Wellbutrin (which regulated norep levels) has positive effects on psirosis. They speculate that increased norep and dopamine may reduce levels of tumor necrosis factor (an imflammatory factor related to psriosis accerated skin turn-over). This made sense to me, as I get much fewer inflammatory (atopic) skin probs on amphetamines.

But recently, I've noticed less elasticity in my skin overall (a normal fact of aging, for sure!); but this effect seems to have come on rather quickly in the last year, during which time I've take a bit more dex than the previous year.

I do exercise, so I think I am doing my part there to keep skin healthy. Perhaps it's related to declining estrogen levels. But I'd like to hear from others.

Any knowledge, observations, or thoughts?

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time.

Posted by loolot on September 2, 2003, at 19:11:33

In reply to Dex and skin effects over time., posted by Zenclearer on September 2, 2003, at 17:29:55

> Calling all middle-aged dex users (or I suppose any amphetamine):
>
> Have you noticed any long-term effects of dex use on your skin? Such as wrinkling (the way cigarette-smokers have more aged skin, due to reduced blood flow on skin surface).
>
> Also, when you lower or stop your dex, do you get really dry skin at first? I do. I think it's an effect related to overall disruption of metabolism and/or hormone levels.
>
> I read an interesting study recently speculating that Wellbutrin (which regulated norep levels) has positive effects on psirosis. They speculate that increased norep and dopamine may reduce levels of tumor necrosis factor (an imflammatory factor related to psriosis accerated skin turn-over). This made sense to me, as I get much fewer inflammatory (atopic) skin probs on amphetamines.
>
> But recently, I've noticed less elasticity in my skin overall (a normal fact of aging, for sure!); but this effect seems to have come on rather quickly in the last year, during which time I've take a bit more dex than the previous year.
>
> I do exercise, so I think I am doing my part there to keep skin healthy. Perhaps it's related to declining estrogen levels. But I'd like to hear from others.
>
> Any knowledge, observations, or thoughts?>>

I am unfortunately not sure about the dex question, but I was actually hoping you could provide a link to the article you read about wellbutrin and anti-inlammatory effects. I have noticed that norepinephrine meds (especially wellbutrin) are the only thing that cures my asthma and sinus problems, and I have always supsected this was the reason.
Good luck and thanks

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time. loolot

Posted by Zenclearer on September 2, 2003, at 19:48:34

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time., posted by loolot on September 2, 2003, at 19:11:33

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12271115&dopt=Abstract

Here it is. This article does not mention the tumor necrosis factor relation, as that is in a recent follow-up letter in the same journal. (This months I believe; I read it the other day at the library, which prompted me to find the original article, cited above). They've also found WB to have a positive effect on Chrohn's Disease, an imflammatory bowel disorder.

Yes, I think you are right about your respiratory effects. Do you have any hairloss on WB? I was on a low dose for ADD, and I had to stop due to hairloss. But it really helped my respiratory probs; I miss that!!!

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time. Zenclearer

Posted by cybercafe on September 3, 2003, at 0:30:15

In reply to Dex and skin effects over time., posted by Zenclearer on September 2, 2003, at 17:29:55

> Calling all middle-aged dex users (or I suppose any amphetamine):
>
> Have you noticed any long-term effects of dex use on your skin? Such as wrinkling (the way cigarette-smokers have more aged skin, due to reduced blood flow on skin surface).
>
> Also, when you lower or stop your dex, do you get really dry skin at first? I do. I think it's an effect related to overall disruption of metabolism and/or hormone levels.
>
> I read an interesting study recently speculating that Wellbutrin (which regulated norep levels) has positive effects on psirosis. They speculate that increased norep and dopamine may reduce levels of tumor necrosis factor (an imflammatory factor related to psriosis accerated skin turn-over). This made sense to me, as I get much fewer inflammatory (atopic) skin probs on amphetamines.
>
> But recently, I've noticed less elasticity in my skin overall (a normal fact of aging, for sure!); but this effect seems to have come on rather quickly in the last year, during which time I've take a bit more dex than the previous year.
>
> I do exercise, so I think I am doing my part there to keep skin healthy. Perhaps it's related to declining estrogen levels. But I'd like to hear from others.
>
> Any knowledge, observations, or thoughts?


dude, now that you mentioned it, i have noticed a drastic reduction in skin elasticity while taking ritalin .... how is skin elasticity related to estrogen levels?

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time.

Posted by loolot on September 3, 2003, at 2:14:29

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time. loolot, posted by Zenclearer on September 2, 2003, at 19:48:34

Thanks so much for the link!
>
> Yes, I think you are right about your respiratory effects. Do you have any hairloss on WB? I was on a low dose for ADD, and I had to stop due to hairloss. But it really helped my respiratory probs; I miss that!!!>>

I did have a little recession in my hairline (I am a female), but it stopped and it wasnt that bad. My hair is just a little thinner now and my forehead is tall. This runs in my family, though, so I always thought it was that moer than the WB. I actually tried taking a supplement which is supposed to block testosterone at the follicle, but it only messed up my cycle, so I went off. The hair isnt a problem now, though.
Do you have asthma too?
I think the stimulant meds can be dehydrating to skin, but that is the only thing I know about that stuff.

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time.

Posted by tealady on September 3, 2003, at 5:16:21

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time., posted by loolot on September 3, 2003, at 2:14:29


> I actually tried taking a supplement which is supposed to block testosterone at the follicle, but it only messed up my cycle, so I went off. The hair isnt a problem now, though.
Was the supplement saw palmetto? I've been thinking of trying it sometime


Estrogen is one thing that causes youthful skin..ask Barbara. My doc, who came from Germany, said that French and German ladies have used estrgoen as face creams for years

My skin has suddenly dried out too. I just noticed a couple of weeks ago..it has gone all lined around eyes and railway tracks in neck..never saw these before. I had just started tyrosine..now you have me thinking!
I thought my vision had just improved and now I can see them all!
I have not been on any other meds but thyroid meds. I have been blaming the thyroid meds for the aging..I used to look very young for my age..I reckon I have caught up 20 or more years in the past two years
Still haven't figured it out..perhaps my body is just stressed from the changes the meds cause?
Jan

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time. cybercafe

Posted by Zenclearer on September 3, 2003, at 7:54:03

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time. Zenclearer, posted by cybercafe on September 3, 2003, at 0:30:15

Estrogen promotes vascularization, and therefore, the skin gets more blood/nutien nourishment, promoting collagen regeneration. Wrinkles occur when the collagen stops regenerating as well; collagen is the skin's scaffolding.

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time.

Posted by cybercafe on September 4, 2003, at 4:06:50

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time. cybercafe, posted by Zenclearer on September 3, 2003, at 7:54:03

> Estrogen promotes vascularization, and therefore, the skin gets more blood/nutien nourishment, promoting collagen regeneration. Wrinkles occur when the collagen stops regenerating as well; collagen is the skin's scaffolding.

can the effects be reversed?

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time. cybercafe

Posted by Zenclearer on September 4, 2003, at 10:55:18

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time., posted by cybercafe on September 4, 2003, at 4:06:50

Vascularization is under constant change, so yes, it can be reversed.


> > Estrogen promotes vascularization, and therefore, the skin gets more blood/nutien nourishment, promoting collagen regeneration. Wrinkles occur when the collagen stops regenerating as well; collagen is the skin's scaffolding.
>
> can the effects be reversed?

 

Re: Dex and skin effects over time. cybercafe

Posted by Zenclearer on September 4, 2003, at 15:59:27

In reply to Re: Dex and skin effects over time., posted by cybercafe on September 4, 2003, at 4:06:50

But no, the breakdown of collagen cannot be easily reversed; although topical retinoids can help (Retin-A).


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