Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 88532

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Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin

Posted by tortoise on January 2, 2002, at 9:48:15

Besides weight gain, I had some memory issues with Paxil. I had very bad memory issues with Serzone. I'm currently on 40 mg of Prozac (for dysthymia, anxiety, and SP) and I've been attributing certain speaking difficulties to anxiety/SP, but after reading some of the archives, I'm wondering if Prozac is also causing some cognitive issues. Neurontin, which I'm considering adding, also seems to be associated with memory issues.

My question is, are there SSRI's and anti-anxiety drugs which are particularly poor for memory? Are there some which are more pro-memory? What do the terms cholinergic and anticholinergic mean? As I apply to grad school, cognitive functioning is important to me! :-)

Thanks!

 

Re: Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin tortoise

Posted by Mitch on January 2, 2002, at 10:58:46

In reply to Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin, posted by tortoise on January 2, 2002, at 9:48:15

> Besides weight gain, I had some memory issues with Paxil. I had very bad memory issues with Serzone. I'm currently on 40 mg of Prozac (for dysthymia, anxiety, and SP) and I've been attributing certain speaking difficulties to anxiety/SP, but after reading some of the archives, I'm wondering if Prozac is also causing some cognitive issues. Neurontin, which I'm considering adding, also seems to be associated with memory issues.
>
> My question is, are there SSRI's and anti-anxiety drugs which are particularly poor for memory? Are there some which are more pro-memory? What do the terms cholinergic and anticholinergic mean? As I apply to grad school, cognitive functioning is important to me! :-)
>
> Thanks!

I have tried *all* of the SSRI's and they *all* have caused *some* cognitive troubles. However, they make conversations with others more "fluid" (more flowing, effortless), so I think the advantages outweigh some of their cognitive quirks. The biggest thing that I notice is name-finding difficulties. Reading and studying do not seem to be affected that much. It is when I meet someone that I know quite well and literally...forget their name! I am a little dyslexic by nature and they do seem to aggravate that a little as well.
Anti-anxiety meds effect me probably the worst of all of them (I just take a little Klonopin at bedtime and some during the day if I need it).

The anticholinergic thing has to do with meds (good examples are tricyclic antidepressants like Elavil or an antihistamine like Benadryl), which dry up secretions causing dry mouth, constipation, affect EKG's, etc. Strong anticholinergic meds can adversely effect your memory causing confusion. Antihistaminic actions of certain meds can cause confusion as well. Prozac is the most "activating" SSRI and probably would be the best one for you to take if you will be studying a lot.
I am guessing-- you might be taking a benzodiazepine (like Klonopin or Valium) that you are thinking of replacing with Neurontin? Neurontin actually helps with think more clearly, but I can't take more than about 600mg/day or it will make me too tired. I tried 1800mg/day for a while and it definitely caused problems at work. Low doses though seem to definitely improve cognitiion (for me anyways).

Mitch

 

Re: Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin }} Mitch

Posted by tortoise on January 2, 2002, at 13:50:26

In reply to Re: Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin tortoise, posted by Mitch on January 2, 2002, at 10:58:46

Thanks, Mitch.

I'm not on a benzo at the moment, just Prozac. My pdoc has been trying all of the SSRI's by themselves before she adds anything. So Neurontin is the first thing she has suggested as an add-on. I have not asked about benzos (I've heard that Klonopin is very good), but I suspect she may be hesitant to use one as the next 'line of defense.'

The 40mg of Prozac has made me jittery and sleepless. Since I'm having such difficulty sleeping, I'm hoping the Neurontin will help with sleep, since I'm now tired during the day anyway (not a big plus for cognitive effectiveness)!

Thanks for explaining the anticholinergic thing. I appreciate it!

tortoise

> I have tried *all* of the SSRI's and they *all* have caused *some* cognitive troubles. However, they make conversations with others more "fluid" (more flowing, effortless), so I think the advantages outweigh some of their cognitive quirks. The biggest thing that I notice is name-finding difficulties. Reading and studying do not seem to be affected that much. It is when I meet someone that I know quite well and literally...forget their name! I am a little dyslexic by nature and they do seem to aggravate that a little as well.
> Anti-anxiety meds effect me probably the worst of all of them (I just take a little Klonopin at bedtime and some during the day if I need it).
>
> The anticholinergic thing has to do with meds (good examples are tricyclic antidepressants like Elavil or an antihistamine like Benadryl), which dry up secretions causing dry mouth, constipation, affect EKG's, etc. Strong anticholinergic meds can adversely effect your memory causing confusion. Antihistaminic actions of certain meds can cause confusion as well. Prozac is the most "activating" SSRI and probably would be the best one for you to take if you will be studying a lot.
> I am guessing-- you might be taking a benzodiazepine (like Klonopin or Valium) that you are thinking of replacing with Neurontin? Neurontin actually helps with think more clearly, but I can't take more than about 600mg/day or it will make me too tired. I tried 1800mg/day for a while and it definitely caused problems at work. Low doses though seem to definitely improve cognitiion (for me anyways).
>
> Mitch

 

Re: Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin }} Mitch tortoise

Posted by Mitch on January 2, 2002, at 14:48:32

In reply to Re: Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin }} Mitch, posted by tortoise on January 2, 2002, at 13:50:26

> Thanks, Mitch.
>
> I'm not on a benzo at the moment, just Prozac. My pdoc has been trying all of the SSRI's by themselves before she adds anything. So Neurontin is the first thing she has suggested as an add-on. I have not asked about benzos (I've heard that Klonopin is very good), but I suspect she may be hesitant to use one as the next 'line of defense.'
>
> The 40mg of Prozac has made me jittery and sleepless. Since I'm having such difficulty sleeping, I'm hoping the Neurontin will help with sleep, since I'm now tired during the day anyway (not a big plus for cognitive effectiveness)!
>
> Thanks for explaining the anticholinergic thing. I appreciate it!
>
> tortoise


I have problems with Prozac and Zoloft keeping me awake at nite, and what happens more often-I keep waking up/falling off over and over and I never get rested enough and like you I am dragging the next day. You might benefit from a single dose of Neurontin at bedtime (say 300mg). If you sleep better (I do), then you will have more energy the next day.

good luck,

Mitch

 

What Mitch Said

Posted by CincyJack on January 5, 2002, at 12:35:51

In reply to Re: Memory, SSRI's, and Neurontin }} Mitch tortoise, posted by Mitch on January 2, 2002, at 14:48:32

"The biggest thing that I notice is name-finding difficulties. "

This describes my issue to a T. After 9 months, it seems to be getting a little better.


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