Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 85624

Shown: posts 1 to 13 of 13. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck

Posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 11:06:14


I'm starting Zanaflex (tizanidine) today which
is an anti-spasmodic dirivative of Clonodine.
Supposedly a bit weaker without as bad sedation
or anti-hypertensive side effects.

Hopefully this will alleviate my Klonopin withdrawal
as well as my tension headaches.

I also think it may act as a good atypical mood
stabilizer as it is a weak partial agonist of
the noradrenaline alpha-2 receptors. This would help
mediate firing in the stress centers of the brain.

crossing my fingers,
john

 

Good Luck John !!!!!! (nm)

Posted by janejj on November 30, 2001, at 12:06:47

In reply to got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 11:06:14

>
> I'm starting Zanaflex (tizanidine) today which
> is an anti-spasmodic dirivative of Clonodine.
> Supposedly a bit weaker without as bad sedation
> or anti-hypertensive side effects.
>
> Hopefully this will alleviate my Klonopin withdrawal
> as well as my tension headaches.
>
> I also think it may act as a good atypical mood
> stabilizer as it is a weak partial agonist of
> the noradrenaline alpha-2 receptors. This would help
> mediate firing in the stress centers of the brain.
>
> crossing my fingers,
> john

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2

Posted by Elizabeth on November 30, 2001, at 15:52:57

In reply to got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 11:06:14

Good luck with this! I'll be interested to hear how it works for you. I've never heard of clonidine or other alpha2-adrenergic agonists being used for benzo withdrawal but maybe it will help. (Are you sure it's a partial agonist, BTW?)

-elizabeth

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck

Posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 18:07:17

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2, posted by Elizabeth on November 30, 2001, at 15:52:57


Hi Elizabeth/Janejj,

I've seen many references to Clonodine (Catapres)
being used for benzo withdrawl. I think this is
fairly common. I haven't seen much about Zanaflex.
Zanaflex has a crummy 1/2 life (time in your body)
so if it works I may need to take many doses
in one day. There is a sustained release version
in Europe which I would try to attempt to talk
my doctor into if this helps. Another med that
I have seen references to treat benzo withdrawl
is Baclofen. I have also had success with Neurontin.
It also seems that nmda antagonists like memantine
share similar properties. So there are many classes
of meds: alpha-2 agonists, anti-convulsants, gabaergic
meds, nmda antagonists. All are helpful for similar
pain syndromes. I think they all have utility in
psychiatry too. I believe some of these atypical
meds I have been studying like Zanaflex and memantine
could be novel adjuncts for people with treatment
resistant depression associated especially with
a response that "poops out".

Anyways, it is believed that alpha-2 agonists
may be helpful in depression/anxiety associated with
post-traumatic stress disorder. I think this
is where I qualify. So I always seem to come
to this conclusion that the meds that are best
suited to treat my pain are indirectly the correct
ones to treat my mood disorders. funny.

Regards and thanks for the support.
"I'll keep you posted".

-john

> Good luck with this! I'll be interested to hear how it works for you. I've never heard of clonidine or other alpha2-adrenergic agonists being used for benzo withdrawal but maybe it will help. (Are you sure it's a partial agonist, BTW?)
>
> -elizabeth

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2

Posted by SLS on November 30, 2001, at 19:42:59

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 18:07:17

Hi John.

> I've seen many references to Clonodine (Catapres)
> being used for benzo withdrawl. I think this is
> fairly common. I haven't seen much about Zanaflex.

I was just becoming interested in tizanidine. I've already broached the subject of using clonidine with my doctor. He knows my feelings regarding my reactions to idazoxan and mirtazepine.

I saw some stuff indicating that tizanidine might be as effective as clonidine in mitigating opioid withdrawal symptoms, but without the hypotensive side effects. I am looking forward to see you do well with it. Another drug that I would like to see brought to market is flesinoxan. Like buspirone, it is a 5-HT1a agonist. However, unlike buspirone (and ipsapirone), I don't think it has any metabolites that antagonize NE alpha-2 receptors. Woo hoo!

I don't seem to be able to read or write in volume lately, so I apologize for not replying to some of your other posts. Besides, I would have to do quite a bit of remedial reading just to understand it all! So many interactions between circuits! I'm afraid I might blow the few I have left should I decide to try. :-) I am grateful that someone here is so strong at understanding neural circuitry and integrating it with the chemistry of neurotransmission.

Is the Zanaflex being prescribed for myofacial pain? Is it expensive?

By the way, how do you respond to Neurontin?


- Scott

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck SLS

Posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 22:36:34

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2, posted by SLS on November 30, 2001, at 19:42:59


Hi Scott,

With my insurance I got a prescription of
1 month of zanaflex to be taken 4 mg at night
and 2 mg in the morning. Cost me $20. Not sure
what it would be without insurance. It seems
the therapeutic dose could vary wildly based off
what I read, so I'm not sure what will be
effective for me (if at all). If it works I will
push my neurologist to let me get the extended
release version from europe. I have also wanted
to try Tenex, but my pdoc is a weeny and poop-pooed
that idea. Tenex can be taken once a day and
is also supposed to be better than clonodine.

As a side not, I am still completly baffled at
how I am responding to the anti-histamine
chlorpheniramine maleate. I tend to get swelling,
sinus type pressure especially after staying up
for a long time or drinking too much caffeine to
the point that it no longer gets me a buzz and
sometimes if I drink alcohol I get head pressure.
I just reached a point 2 yrs ago when caffeine
would never give me a buzz and I always have these
weird headaches and then the severe mood problems.
I'm wondering if his whole stupid thing could be
allergy related. It started 4 yrs
after I moved to Austin. Shortly after I started
to become sensitive to allergies in Austin (which
is the allergy capitol of the world and people
tend to develop allergies after 2-4 yrs of
residency), I went down hill.
I have also noticed that at times if I travel say up north
and the weather is dry and the heat is on, then
I get a bad pressure headache. Anyways, I was
taking benadryl to help me sleep, but then stumbled
onto chlortrimetron and it didn't work well to
help me sleep, so I took a whopper dose and whamo,
no depression, and a dopamine buzz. Drinking caffeine
gives me a buzz and clears up sinuses like
taking pseudoephedrine. The effect doesn't poop
out??? I've heard of allergy induced depressions
and interactions between acetylcholine-noradrenaline
so that's where i am heading in my testing.

As far as neurontin went, It was well tolerated.
It helped relieve anxiety and peripheral tingling
from the klonopin withdrawal the last time I tried
to stop klonopin, but it never was really effective
at getting rid of the head pain and it didn't
allow for a robust anti-depressant response.

Lamictal is strange in that it has a small
thereapuetic window for me of 150-225 mg. If I
go to 300 mg, I get severe emotional numbing and
head pain. I know now from reading about nmda
receptors that there is a fine balance between
too much and too little stimulation.

Well I hope you find an anti-dote to your
problem. If the zanaflex doesn't work I'll
stay on the anti-histamine. Mean time I'm
going to study the muscarinic system some
more to figure why benadryl doesn't help
but chlorpheniramine does. At this point it
is whatever works.....

Regards,
John


> Hi John.
>
> > I've seen many references to Clonodine (Catapres)
> > being used for benzo withdrawl. I think this is
> > fairly common. I haven't seen much about Zanaflex.
>
> I was just becoming interested in tizanidine. I've already broached the subject of using clonidine with my doctor. He knows my feelings regarding my reactions to idazoxan and mirtazepine.
>
> I saw some stuff indicating that tizanidine might be as effective as clonidine in mitigating opioid withdrawal symptoms, but without the hypotensive side effects. I am looking forward to see you do well with it. Another drug that I would like to see brought to market is flesinoxan. Like buspirone, it is a 5-HT1a agonist. However, unlike buspirone (and ipsapirone), I don't think it has any metabolites that antagonize NE alpha-2 receptors. Woo hoo!
>
> I don't seem to be able to read or write in volume lately, so I apologize for not replying to some of your other posts. Besides, I would have to do quite a bit of remedial reading just to understand it all! So many interactions between circuits! I'm afraid I might blow the few I have left should I decide to try. :-) I am grateful that someone here is so strong at understanding neural circuitry and integrating it with the chemistry of neurotransmission.
>
> Is the Zanaflex being prescribed for myofacial pain? Is it expensive?
>
> By the way, how do you respond to Neurontin?
>
>
> - Scott

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription - SLS

Posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 22:51:01

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck SLS, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 22:36:34


Scott,

BTW, flesinoxan was dropped by Solvay
from testing. Apparently the side effect profile
was bad. So I don't think it will be hitting
the market.

I think the closest thing you can come to
not taking an anti-psychotic is Serzone.
The other choice is Ketanserin, but I don't
know if it is still available anywhere.
When I took Serzone, it also completely relieved
both my pain and my tolerance. It was the
only anti-depressant to do this, so I'm still
studying why this may be the case. Now I wonder
if it has anti-muscarinic effects based off
my chlorpheniramine maleate experience.
Serzones alpha-1 antagonism and 5ht-2 antagonism make it similar
to zyprexa. But I think Serzone is a fairly potent
alpha-1 antagonist, as it makes people so darn
drowsy. I was thinking taking Serzone with
Provigil may be a good combo. Assuming the
Serzone prevents Provigil poop out. Serzone
completely prevented caffeine poop-out for
me.

-john

>
> Hi Scott,
>
> With my insurance I got a prescription of
> 1 month of zanaflex to be taken 4 mg at night
> and 2 mg in the morning. Cost me $20. Not sure
> what it would be without insurance. It seems
> the therapeutic dose could vary wildly based off
> what I read, so I'm not sure what will be
> effective for me (if at all). If it works I will
> push my neurologist to let me get the extended
> release version from europe. I have also wanted
> to try Tenex, but my pdoc is a weeny and poop-pooed
> that idea. Tenex can be taken once a day and
> is also supposed to be better than clonodine.
>
> As a side not, I am still completly baffled at
> how I am responding to the anti-histamine
> chlorpheniramine maleate. I tend to get swelling,
> sinus type pressure especially after staying up
> for a long time or drinking too much caffeine to
> the point that it no longer gets me a buzz and
> sometimes if I drink alcohol I get head pressure.
> I just reached a point 2 yrs ago when caffeine
> would never give me a buzz and I always have these
> weird headaches and then the severe mood problems.
> I'm wondering if his whole stupid thing could be
> allergy related. It started 4 yrs
> after I moved to Austin. Shortly after I started
> to become sensitive to allergies in Austin (which
> is the allergy capitol of the world and people
> tend to develop allergies after 2-4 yrs of
> residency), I went down hill.
> I have also noticed that at times if I travel say up north
> and the weather is dry and the heat is on, then
> I get a bad pressure headache. Anyways, I was
> taking benadryl to help me sleep, but then stumbled
> onto chlortrimetron and it didn't work well to
> help me sleep, so I took a whopper dose and whamo,
> no depression, and a dopamine buzz. Drinking caffeine
> gives me a buzz and clears up sinuses like
> taking pseudoephedrine. The effect doesn't poop
> out??? I've heard of allergy induced depressions
> and interactions between acetylcholine-noradrenaline
> so that's where i am heading in my testing.
>
> As far as neurontin went, It was well tolerated.
> It helped relieve anxiety and peripheral tingling
> from the klonopin withdrawal the last time I tried
> to stop klonopin, but it never was really effective
> at getting rid of the head pain and it didn't
> allow for a robust anti-depressant response.
>
> Lamictal is strange in that it has a small
> thereapuetic window for me of 150-225 mg. If I
> go to 300 mg, I get severe emotional numbing and
> head pain. I know now from reading about nmda
> receptors that there is a fine balance between
> too much and too little stimulation.
>
> Well I hope you find an anti-dote to your
> problem. If the zanaflex doesn't work I'll
> stay on the anti-histamine. Mean time I'm
> going to study the muscarinic system some
> more to figure why benadryl doesn't help
> but chlorpheniramine does. At this point it
> is whatever works.....
>
> Regards,
> John
>
>
> > Hi John.
> >
> > > I've seen many references to Clonodine (Catapres)
> > > being used for benzo withdrawl. I think this is
> > > fairly common. I haven't seen much about Zanaflex.
> >
> > I was just becoming interested in tizanidine. I've already broached the subject of using clonidine with my doctor. He knows my feelings regarding my reactions to idazoxan and mirtazepine.
> >
> > I saw some stuff indicating that tizanidine might be as effective as clonidine in mitigating opioid withdrawal symptoms, but without the hypotensive side effects. I am looking forward to see you do well with it. Another drug that I would like to see brought to market is flesinoxan. Like buspirone, it is a 5-HT1a agonist. However, unlike buspirone (and ipsapirone), I don't think it has any metabolites that antagonize NE alpha-2 receptors. Woo hoo!
> >
> > I don't seem to be able to read or write in volume lately, so I apologize for not replying to some of your other posts. Besides, I would have to do quite a bit of remedial reading just to understand it all! So many interactions between circuits! I'm afraid I might blow the few I have left should I decide to try. :-) I am grateful that someone here is so strong at understanding neural circuitry and integrating it with the chemistry of neurotransmission.
> >
> > Is the Zanaflex being prescribed for myofacial pain? Is it expensive?
> >
> > By the way, how do you respond to Neurontin?
> >
> >
> > - Scott

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck SLS

Posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 23:04:34

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2, posted by SLS on November 30, 2001, at 19:42:59


Oops forgot to answer one of your questions,
the zanaflex is being prescribed for myofacial
pain. My pdoc says he can't understand my
pain and it needs to be looked at by a neurologist.
The neurologist said that I have already tried
everything in the book besides anti-spasmodics
and that is when he suggested zanaflex. I was
already interested in the possibility of an a2
agonist, so I was hip to the idea.

Another med I could try is baclofen (a gabaergic anti-spasmodic).
Baclofen has been shown to have anti-addictive/tolerance
properties like the nmda antagonists.

I also think Acamprosate (a combined gaba agonist/
nmda antagonist) or memantine (nmda antagonist)
may help. Acamprosate + memantine may be a very
potent combo. Supposedly great for TD.

Anyways, I'm also scheduled to get an MRI, but
the doc doesn't think it will show much.

-john

> Hi John.
>
> > I've seen many references to Clonodine (Catapres)
> > being used for benzo withdrawl. I think this is
> > fairly common. I haven't seen much about Zanaflex.
>
> I was just becoming interested in tizanidine. I've already broached the subject of using clonidine with my doctor. He knows my feelings regarding my reactions to idazoxan and mirtazepine.
>
> I saw some stuff indicating that tizanidine might be as effective as clonidine in mitigating opioid withdrawal symptoms, but without the hypotensive side effects. I am looking forward to see you do well with it. Another drug that I would like to see brought to market is flesinoxan. Like buspirone, it is a 5-HT1a agonist. However, unlike buspirone (and ipsapirone), I don't think it has any metabolites that antagonize NE alpha-2 receptors. Woo hoo!
>
> I don't seem to be able to read or write in volume lately, so I apologize for not replying to some of your other posts. Besides, I would have to do quite a bit of remedial reading just to understand it all! So many interactions between circuits! I'm afraid I might blow the few I have left should I decide to try. :-) I am grateful that someone here is so strong at understanding neural circuitry and integrating it with the chemistry of neurotransmission.
>
> Is the Zanaflex being prescribed for myofacial pain? Is it expensive?
>
> By the way, how do you respond to Neurontin?
>
>
> - Scott

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2

Posted by Mitch on November 30, 2001, at 23:42:26

In reply to got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 11:06:14

>
> I'm starting Zanaflex (tizanidine) today which
> is an anti-spasmodic dirivative of Clonodine.
> Supposedly a bit weaker without as bad sedation
> or anti-hypertensive side effects.
>
> Hopefully this will alleviate my Klonopin withdrawal
> as well as my tension headaches.
>
> I also think it may act as a good atypical mood
> stabilizer as it is a weak partial agonist of
> the noradrenaline alpha-2 receptors. This would help
> mediate firing in the stress centers of the brain.
>
> crossing my fingers,
> john

Hi John,

I hope this does some sort of *magic* for you. In my case the Wellbutrin is improving things with time. I feel a little wired, but I am not *losing my temper*. I really think your thoughts about WB slowing NE firing in the LC as opposed to A2 antagonists increasing NE firing is very accurate. I had a very confrontational experience with my boss today. On Remeron or Buspar I could easily picture getting reprimanded or fired after a big adrenalizing temper display. Instead, I just told my boss what I thought-in a calm *assertive* way and within an hour or so I was chatting with another coworker and smiling (not obsessing and ruminating over the confrontation-I had put it down and left it behind)!
This makes me wonder about alpha2 *agonists* as well.

Keep us posted on how this plays out,

Mitch

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck JohnX2

Posted by Elizabeth on December 1, 2001, at 14:44:40

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 18:07:17

> I've seen many references to Clonodine (Catapres)
> being used for benzo withdrawl. I think this is
> fairly common.

Well, I hope it works. I'm familiar with the use of clonidine (the correct spelling, BTW :-) ) and other such drugs for opioid withdrawal, although the alpha-2 agonists have a reputation for not being very helpful in that situation (they alleviate a couple of the more minor symptoms, that's it). Perhaps they're more helpful in benzo withdrawal.

> Zanaflex has a crummy 1/2 life (time in your body)
> so if it works I may need to take many doses
> in one day.

Indeed. Can I ask why your doctor chose it over clonidine or guanfacine (Tenex, another alpha-2 agonist)?

> Another med that
> I have seen references to treat benzo withdrawl
> is Baclofen.

Baclofen is a GABA-2 agonist. I've tried it as a muscle relaxant, and it didn't work at all, while benzos worked sometimes but were not reliable. I also know a guy who tried using baclofen to substitute for benzos (to prevent withdrawal, if nothing else) and reported that it didn't work at all. I have seen some possible preclinical evidence that it would have antitolerance properties, but nothing in humans. I hope that if you try it, it is helpful for you, in one way or another.

> I have also had success with Neurontin.

Now that seems like a good idea, although I have heard a few stories of people trying it without success (the dose may have been inadequate).

> It also seems that nmda antagonists like memantine
> share similar properties.

FWIW, there's an over-the-counter NMDA antagonist, dextromethorphan, that is sold as a cough suppressant. It's found in such products as Robitussin Maximum Strength, although most things that have dextromethorphan also have other things in them that you don't necessarily want (such as pseudoephedrine, antihistamines, or guaifenisen).

> I believe some of these atypical
> meds I have been studying like Zanaflex and memantine
> could be novel adjuncts for people with treatment
> resistant depression associated especially with
> a response that "poops out".

That's possible, and it certainly ought to be investigated. Two things to watch out for: clonidine (and probably other alpha-2 agonists) can worsen depression; and there was once hope that NMDA antagonists would prevent or slow the development of tolerance to opioids, but this proved not to be the case. So I'm not so sure that they would be any more helpful for antidepressant tolerance.

Interestingly, a small study of ketamine (also an NMDA antagonist) for depression produced positive results. (See: Biol Psychiatry 2000 Feb 15;47(4):351-4. Antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressed patients. Berman RM et al.) I don't believe this result has been replicated, but I would like to see more work in this area.

> Anyways, it is believed that alpha-2 agonists
> may be helpful in depression/anxiety associated with
> post-traumatic stress disorder.

I've heard of them being used to attenuate the startle response (and other hyperarousal sx) and to prevent nightmares in PTSD -- haven't heard anything of interest regarding general anxiety or depression associated with PTSD.

BTW, that's interesting that you get something positive out of ChlorTrimeton (my own antihistamine of choice). Although I prefer to avoid characterizations like "dopamine buzz" that imply a particular mechanism, it does sound like you've found something that helps you and that is relatively safe and easy to use. How much are you taking? (I have to take quite a lot to overcome the histamine release provoked by buprenorphine.)

-elizabeth

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck

Posted by JohnX2 on December 1, 2001, at 20:28:27

In reply to got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 11:06:14


Well on my 1st dose I pulled a classic mistake.
Fortunately I wasn't driving my car. I took
the recommended 4 mg and after 1 hr noticed
nothing. So then like a genious I said, hmm
maybe I should try another 4 mg. And then I
was *TOTALLY* wiped out.

I'm trying 2 mg doses today. The other dose
made me really drowsy, but it didn't make me
feel weak. Also, it didn't seem to slow down
my heart rate as I hoped.

If I still feel drowsy, I may tinked with a dash of
Wellbutrin.

Btw, Remeron completely antagonizes the effect
of tizanidine. I tried a 15 mg dose of remeron
curious to see how the alpha-2 antagonist would
interact with the alpha-2 agonist. Going for
the cancellation theory. Another bonehead mood.
Shouldn't screw with the med until I am familiar
with it. Why do I put myself through this torture.

I'm getting too cocky starting meds because the
last many meds went so well (except trileptal).
I need to remember to start slowly.

I wonder how long and if and how my body would
adjust to Zanaflex.

The thought behind using it as a buffer med
is similar to Buspar's partial agonism which
can increase OR decrease serotonin. But
tizanidine is working on a noradrenergic path.
There are different affinity states for receptors. Some are high and some are
low. In some people, especially PTSD, the ratio
of affinity states (the ability for a chemical
to bind to the receptor) is messed up. In Ptsd
the thought is that the noradrenergic
alpha-2 autoreceptors are messed up.
There are fewer binding sites and they are
chronically down-regulated and can be easily overly
desensitized. These people are overreactive
to alpha-2 antagonists, which can invoke a
panic attacks/anxiety and ultimately
an exhaustion of catecholimines.
And its possible that meds that slow firing
in this area (the LC) are overreactive
the other way.

Lots of hypothesis.

BTW, I did well on the beta-blocker propranolol.
It stopped my heart pounding and nightmares from
Remeron but didn't help my headaches.
Also propranolol didn't make me drowsy. Pindolol
made me anxious and after 3 days gave me a manic
reaction.

Neurontin was the best med for benzo withdrawl so
far. Particularly dealing with tingling in extremeties
and withdrawl anxiety. Unfortunately it also
didn't help with my headaches.

-john


>
> I'm starting Zanaflex (tizanidine) today which
> is an anti-spasmodic dirivative of Clonodine.
> Supposedly a bit weaker without as bad sedation
> or anti-hypertensive side effects.
>
> Hopefully this will alleviate my Klonopin withdrawal
> as well as my tension headaches.
>
> I also think it may act as a good atypical mood
> stabilizer as it is a weak partial agonist of
> the noradrenaline alpha-2 receptors. This would help
> mediate firing in the stress centers of the brain.
>
> crossing my fingers,
> john

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription UPDATE 1

Posted by JohnX2 on December 1, 2001, at 23:57:38

In reply to got a zanaflex prescription; wish me luck, posted by JohnX2 on November 30, 2001, at 11:06:14


I think Zanaflex is working.

The pain in my head is going down substantially,
I feel much less anxious, and I can sit still.
Plus my klonopin craving is gone.
I'm still a bit drowsy which can be solved
by reducing klonopin. ;)

I hope this isn't another cruel joke.

-john


>
> I'm starting Zanaflex (tizanidine) today which
> is an anti-spasmodic dirivative of Clonodine.
> Supposedly a bit weaker without as bad sedation
> or anti-hypertensive side effects.
>
> Hopefully this will alleviate my Klonopin withdrawal
> as well as my tension headaches.
>
> I also think it may act as a good atypical mood
> stabilizer as it is a weak partial agonist of
> the noradrenaline alpha-2 receptors. This would help
> mediate firing in the stress centers of the brain.
>
> crossing my fingers,
> john

 

Re: got a zanaflex prescription UPDATE 2

Posted by JohnX2 on December 2, 2001, at 12:01:35

In reply to Re: got a zanaflex prescription UPDATE 1, posted by JohnX2 on December 1, 2001, at 23:57:38


I woke up anxious.
I took my 1st 2mg dose of Zanaflex and
felt fine 2 hrs later, then after about
4 hrs I started to feel anxious again, so
I just took another 2 mg dose. This 1/2
life sucks royally. It is doing the best
job of any med to date of alleviating Klonopin
withdrawal (which should be really bad right
now because I'm running short on Klonopin and
cut the dose from 6- >3 mg/day).

I really wonder if clonidine wouldn't be just
as good. I never had a hypotensive problem with
the beta-blockers. The clonidine patch works
round the clock. I also wonder if guanfacine
would not work, it has a really long 1/2 life
and is supposed to be very benign on the side
effects. Hmm.

-john

>
> I think Zanaflex is working.
>
> The pain in my head is going down substantially,
> I feel much less anxious, and I can sit still.
> Plus my klonopin craving is gone.
> I'm still a bit drowsy which can be solved
> by reducing klonopin. ;)
>
> I hope this isn't another cruel joke.
>
> -john
>
>
> >
> > I'm starting Zanaflex (tizanidine) today which
> > is an anti-spasmodic dirivative of Clonodine.
> > Supposedly a bit weaker without as bad sedation
> > or anti-hypertensive side effects.
> >
> > Hopefully this will alleviate my Klonopin withdrawal
> > as well as my tension headaches.
> >
> > I also think it may act as a good atypical mood
> > stabilizer as it is a weak partial agonist of
> > the noradrenaline alpha-2 receptors. This would help
> > mediate firing in the stress centers of the brain.
> >
> > crossing my fingers,
> > john


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[dr. bob] Dr. Bob is Robert Hsiung, MD, bob@dr-bob.org

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