Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1334

Shown: posts 1 to 9 of 9. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Nicotine gum

Posted by Paul on November 24, 1998, at 8:37:35

I have never smoked in my life, and it may sound silly,
but I have started chewing Nicorette gum and it really
helps my ADD, especially in the workplace. Besides being
addictive, what are the dangers of nicotine administered
without harmful tobacco? Of course it must be better because
it's pharmaceutically pure and obviously doesn't cause lung
cancer. I've also read that there's a link between lack
of nicotinic receptors in the brains of Alzheimer's patients,
which seems to suggest that nicotine plays some role in
enhancing mental funtioning, which seems self-evident from
its effects.

 

Re: Nicotine gum

Posted by Janey on November 24, 1998, at 18:17:16

In reply to Nicotine gum, posted by Paul on November 24, 1998, at 8:37:35

Paul,

Nicotine itself is a carcinogen I believe.
You could run the risk of mouth and throat cancer.

Perhaps one of the docs here can confirm this.

Janey

 

Re: Nicotine gum

Posted by Toby on November 25, 1998, at 15:36:44

In reply to Nicotine gum, posted by Paul on November 24, 1998, at 8:37:35

Nicotine is a stimulant and is the addictive component of tobacco. Since it is a stimulant, that is why it is helping your attention deficit disorder. However, please be aware that the nicotine in nicorette gum is very short acting and your brain will quickly get used to it and it won't really help with the ADD after awhile. There have been some studies that show that early on nicotine improves concentration somewhat, but once a person is addicted, that they perform worse on tests of concentration, even right after getting a dose of nicotine. You would be better off going to your doctor (even a family doctor) and getting regular treatment for the ADD with something less addictive than nicotine.

Nicotine is not the carcinogen in cigarettes, it's the tar and carbon monoxide that do the damage there. Side effects of nicotine gum or patches would be headace, nausea, dizziness, possibly high blood pressure. Over the long haul, nicotine might contribute to coronary artery disease due to the increased blood pressure.

 

Question -- Re: Nicotine gum

Posted by Janey on November 25, 1998, at 22:03:34

In reply to Re: Nicotine gum, posted by Toby on November 25, 1998, at 15:36:44

What is the cancer-causing agent in smokeless tobacco?

 

Re: Question -- Re: Nicotine gum

Posted by Paul on November 30, 1998, at 16:48:30

In reply to Question -- Re: Nicotine gum, posted by Janey on November 25, 1998, at 22:03:34

Thanks for the info. I don't plan on using it for long, just until I see my doc to get more Ritalin. And you're right; after habitual use it seems to have no effect.

And it's very expensive!!

 

Re: Question -- Re: Nicotine gum

Posted by Richard on January 2, 2000, at 14:56:39

In reply to Re: Question -- Re: Nicotine gum, posted by Paul on November 30, 1998, at 16:48:30

Paul- fyi

Of course this is anecdotal, but you may be interested in my own experience.

Like you, I've never smoked, or rather I tried smoking while in the Air Force (1961-63). After two weeks, I noticed it interfered with my breathing, and seemed to produce an acidity in the mouth which might affect the teeth. So I've not smoked for the ensuing 39 years.

I knew, however, of the stimulant affects of nicotine. Noticing that Imus uses it, I did some research and found that the consensus of the medical literature (for whatever that is worth), is that it produces, if anything, improvements in blood pressure.

As a joke to my smoking-wife, I told her I was jealous of those with a bad habit, and, maybe, if I started with Nicorette, I could work backwards to the day when I could tolerate cigarettes.

That was 3 years ago. In that time, I've returned my weight to high school levels (which was on the low side since I swam on the Varsity team) having lost an average of about 1/2 lb per week. I'm down to 175 from 260 at the start. I've maintained my muscle-mass with weight lifting, and high-tech supplements. I feel well; I get nothing but positive feedback from friends and relatives.

Further I had my first health check in 10 years, with blood pressures of 120/82, down from my last when I was playing raquetball through the '80's. At the time, according to Kaiser, I was at 132/95 in 1990.

Actually I knew this, as I take my own blood pressure daily, and record everything I eat, having done this for the last 3 years.

No one can predict the long term effects of Nicotine usage, especially since genetics plays such an important role in most forms of cancer. If my use of Nicotine gum were to show any side effects (such as lesions in the mouth) I would quit in an instance, as I tend to be reasonably disciplined.

The upside is, as you've noticed, is a calming effect, and a stimulant effect.

The idea that you've become acclimated is highly subjective. Nicorette has the advantage of allowing you to adjust the levels of the drug in your system under your own control, rather than a prescriptive medicine where one must include the medical profession in the loop.

Ritilin is not without risk, btw. It is also a stimulant. Addictive to a lessor extent than other amphetamines. The biggest problem with that route, in my humble opinion, is the risk of putting your fate in the hands of someone other than yourself. Mental and physical independence is to be highly prized.

A good balanced diet with moderate excercise would be my prescription. And maybe some study of both in your spare time.

So chew away if you can afford/justify it. At some point, if the literature continues to show no problems, the cost will come down as the market will prevail.

Just wanted to make sure the scare mongers were not the only factor in your choices.

Richard

> Thanks for the info. I don't plan on using it for long, just until I see my doc to get more Ritalin. And you're right; after habitual use it seems to have no effect.
> And it's very expensive!!

 

Re: Nicotine gum

Posted by Sandy721 on May 11, 2001, at 4:36:58

In reply to Nicotine gum, posted by Paul on November 24, 1998, at 8:37:35

Could chewing the nicotine gum make a cracked tooth go off like a bomb in my jaw. I'm out of town and my dentist left for Pittsburgh this p.m. Neither the hydrocodone or the vicoprofen is helping much on the pain. So I've got Friday to Monday at 11 to suffer.
Is there any research on this issue? HELP

Sandy721

 

Re: Nicotine gum Sandy721

Posted by Sulpicia on May 11, 2001, at 18:44:25

In reply to Re: Nicotine gum, posted by Sandy721 on May 11, 2001, at 4:36:58

> Could chewing the nicotine gum make a cracked tooth go off like a bomb in my jaw. I'm out of town and my dentist left for Pittsburgh this p.m. Neither the hydrocodone or the vicoprofen is helping much on the pain. So I've got Friday to Monday at 11 to suffer.
> Is there any research on this issue? HELP
>
> Sandy721

ANYTHING, let alone nicotine gum, can make a cracked tooth go crazy.
I sympathize, I've been there. Probably you just made the crack a tiny
bit bigger and you've got air on a nerve or something charming. Or an
infection.
Were I in your shoes, I might find a dentist now [thru the ER of the best
hospital you can find]. It's possible to put a metal cap on a cracked tooth --
it seals it, keeps the air out, and it's not a big deal -- read: simple to do
and you're not at the mercy of some unknown dentist. An infection can be
irrigated and ABs will help within 24 hrs with luck.
Feel better.
S.

 

Re: Question -- Re: Nicotine gum Richard

Posted by Jaybee on June 13, 2004, at 9:36:25

In reply to Re: Question -- Re: Nicotine gum, posted by Richard on January 2, 2000, at 14:56:39

Richard,

How are you doing with the Nicotine gum ? I am intrigued because I recently began smoking very lightly but noticing that I started to become addicted, and did not want the smoke ill effects, tried the gum, and it did kill this craving for sure.
The good part is that I feel better doing the gum than taking the adderall, that I had been taking for the last two years.
With the gum, I also noticed that I don't crave the coffee/caffeine like I used to both before and after the adderall. So I thought, hmm, maybe this is a better stimulant for my add than the typical meds.
Do you find your need for the gum increasing in quantity ? Or have you been able to limit this ?
Wow, if I could cut down on the caffeine and do without the adderall and feel even better than I did with both of these I am very intrigued.
Looking forward to your reply.

Thanks


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