Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 55240

Shown: posts 1 to 11 of 11. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Med Problems (So what else is new)

Posted by Shirley1 on March 1, 2001, at 14:58:25

Having LD and ADD, I got sidetracked and haven't visited this board for awhile. Also, having to register threw me off strides but here I am.

Like many of you on these boards, I am so tired of fighting med problems and would greatly appreciate your input. Here is my med history as best I can remember it. Diagnosis is ADD, Depression, and Anxiety.

1. Was on Serzone by itself for about 8 months. I remember it being moderately effective with minimal side effects but I continued to have breakthrough serious depressions even at higher doses. Interestingly, when I was put on Cylert, things seemed to get better. But I couldn't take Cylert at a higher dose

Next stop on the tour was effexor. Again, it did a pretty respectable job but thanks to the insomnia it caused, I was taking three meds at night to fall asleep. Didn't gain weight though. I'm not sure but I think I took it about a year and a half.

But I still had some breakthrough serious depressions so the next attempt was Zoloft and Adderall, with me cutting down to only remeron at night. This combination was a winner and lasted about a year and half.

However, Not only was I starting to get once a month agiatation after my period started but Zoloft was causing problems other times. Because I was gaining weight at an intense level. I decided to give Prozac a try.

At first, I had good luck with it and in many ways, it's been beneficial. But I keep having this edge that I have heard people describe with Celexa, that I think is similar to Prozac.

Even though Prozac is suppose to be effective for PMS, my food cravings last time were more intense than they had ever been while I was on Zoloft. Also, with Zoloft I could stay on the same dose through the month but I can't with Prozac and have a hard time figuring out when to cut the dosage. Then, when I do cut the dosage, I feel the effects that way.

My questions are this - 1. Should I stay with Prozac and ask my p-doc for the liquid kind so I have more flexibility with the dose? Or is my body saying it doesn't want any more SSRI's and it's time to look at something else?

Oh, one more thing about Prozac, I am getting the same blah feeling as I did while on Zoloft. I am not depressed but I don't feel like doing anything. Raising the adderall or ritalin dose (depending on which one I have been on) has caused problems in the past so that's not an option.

Anyway, I see my P-Doc on Monday so any suggestions or thoughts you might have would be greatly appreciated.

Shirley

PS - The weight gain is getting worse on the Prozac. If I felt it was working better, I would put up with it.

 

Re: Med Problems (So what else is new)

Posted by SalArmy4me on March 1, 2001, at 15:32:51

In reply to Med Problems (So what else is new), posted by Shirley1 on March 1, 2001, at 14:58:25

I was thinking that you should get off the Prozac which doesn't agree with you, and keep BuSpar in mind. It has anti-anxiety and antidepressant properties; also, it has no weight gain, appetite stimulation, sexual side-effects or anticholinergic side-effects.

http://www.med.nyu.edu/Psych/aug/sld028.html

I'm on BuSpar 60 mg.

 

Re: Med Problems ---Buspar SalArmy4me

Posted by Noa on March 1, 2001, at 16:13:27

In reply to Re: Med Problems (So what else is new), posted by SalArmy4me on March 1, 2001, at 15:32:51

Does it help you?

 

Re: Med Problems ---Buspar

Posted by SalArmy4me on March 1, 2001, at 20:23:02

In reply to Re: Med Problems ---Buspar SalArmy4me, posted by Noa on March 1, 2001, at 16:13:27

> Does it help you?

Yes, it does. Tremendously. For years I never thought it would do anything, because I heard rumors that it was weak, or only for anxiety. I take 60 mg per day with no side-effects. It may even improve my sex-drive.

 

Re: Med Problems (So what else is new) Shirley1

Posted by Sulpicia on March 1, 2001, at 22:26:01

In reply to Med Problems (So what else is new), posted by Shirley1 on March 1, 2001, at 14:58:25

> Hi Shirley --
all I can say is ditto here to much of your history, with the exception of the AD tours.
I tried paxil for several months but a) it never worked that well, and b) I hated the side-
effects, like the weird muscle thing that kept me from running, which I love and need.

I take adderall and my favorite old stand-by, tofranil -- an "old" tricyclic. It works.
It's not new and fancy, I don't have any side effects, and it works with no loss of effectiveness.

It also doesn't interact with the adderall like the paxil did -- created lots of anxiety
and useless interests [like shampooing the rug] and this combo of paxil and adderall also
made me depressed!!

The old tricyclics are not sexy, you need to make sure you don't have any contraindicating medical
conditions, you need an EKG just to be sure that your heart isn't going to do something weird, but from
where I sit, it works. Period.

Two last suggestions: if you were diagnosed with ADD as an adult, find a clinician to do some talking
therapy with. Try the CHADD website for a referral or an adult support group. ADD is a big deal, much
larger in fact than most of us realize. I've really benefited from theraputic support.
With your doc's approval, consider switching your dose of adderall a bit -- think about when you are most
naturally alert during the day and when you are not. You may need a larger dose in the AM to get going.
Or you may find that it works to take a higher dose to maximize your natural periods of alertness and focus.
The practice of 2 or 3 identical doses thruout the day may not make sense for all of us. Also try to find
the time[s] when your body really needs a rest; I have a period between 1-2:30 in the afternoon when I simply
go into some form of hibernation. It's a lifelong thing and if I try to use adderall to work against this
this, I'm still in a stupor but then the higher dose that I took to maintain focus really makes me nuts
from tension. So I'm still not productive. Listen to your body and look at your daily routine and experiment.

Also ask your pdoc whether a given AD is sedating or energizing, in his opinion. Unless you have sleep
problems, given your anxiety, better a sedating one [they don't actually sedate you -- just a term of reference].
I also highly recommend the ADD site at About.com for support. Lots of smart and caring adults there. Super
moderator and a wealth of info on the home site.

Good luck and let us know what happens.
S.

 

Re: Med Problems (So what else is new)

Posted by Shirley1 on March 5, 2001, at 19:36:44

In reply to Re: Med Problems (So what else is new), posted by SalArmy4me on March 1, 2001, at 15:32:51

Sal,

Thank you for providing the link to that wondeful study on Buspar. It seems like it and Pinlodol are the most effective drugs for combatting SSRI side effects. Of course, your mileage may vary.

I'm curious, what is myoclonus? It's not in my dictionary.

I will definately think about asking my psychiatrist for Buspar to augment the Prozac. The Prozac in many ways has been very helpful, it just has provided me some nasty side effects. So Buspar might be the key.

Thanks again.

Shirley

 

Re: Med Problems (So what else is new)

Posted by Shirley1 on March 5, 2001, at 19:50:08

In reply to Re: Med Problems (So what else is new) Shirley1, posted by Sulpicia on March 1, 2001, at 22:26:01

S,

Thank you for your suggestions. I am familiar with the about com site but haven't been there in a while. So I greatly appreciate your advice because it's a great reminder.

Same goes for Chadd. I need to look into that.

I'm curious, where you on any other SSRI's besides Paxil? I'm just wondering if I should try augmenting Prozac with something else since in some ways it's been good or if it's time to give the tryiclics a try. I'm sensing that Paxil never was helpful for you while Prozac has done some good things for me. But when it roars it's ugly head, that's when I start wondering about what to do. My psychiatrist suggested aumenting the Prozac with a low dose of Wellbutrin, which I have serious doubts about.

To be continued.

Shirley

 

Re: myoclonus

Posted by dj on March 5, 2001, at 20:02:23

In reply to Re: Med Problems (So what else is new), posted by Shirley1 on March 5, 2001, at 19:36:44

> I'm curious, what is myoclonus? It's not in my > dictionary.

I was curious too, so I plugged it into http://www.google.com and came up with this site:
http://www.myoclonus.com/whatis.htm and this definition:
"WHAT IS MYOCLONUS?

Myoclonus describes both a symptom and a disease. The disease myoclonus ("myo") muscle ("clonus") jerk, describes a brief, sudden, singular, shock-like muscle contraction that refers to a condition characterized by myoclonus. Myoclonus arises from damage to the central nervous system, which comprises the brain and spinal cord. Myoclonus is activated by an electrical discharge originating in the central nervous system, which is transmitted through peripheral nerves to produce the sudden muscle contractions.

Myoclonic jerks can cause disability by interrupting normal posture or movement. Recurrent or severe myoclonic jerking is characterized by frequent forceful uncontrollable muscle contractions of any body part, or the entire body, making independent motor function impossible. Patients severely afflicted with myoclonus may be unable to stand or ambulate, reach or grasp objects, feed or dress themselves, speak, or even direct their gaze because of the involuntary muscle jerking interfering with all of these functions. Myoclonus is often triggered by movement. Patients may manifest no myoclonus at rest or when asleep, yet may experience uncontrolled jerking when attempting to move. The brief positive muscle contractions of myoclonus are often accompanied with sudden, unexpected inhibitions of muscle contraction, or lapses of posture. This phenomenon, termed negative myoclonus, makes standing, walking, reaching, or grasping objects very difficult.

The diagnostic approach to a patient with myoclonus has a dual objective; identifying the site of origin of the myoclonus within the nervous system, and establishing the cause. Clinicians are able to categorize myoclonus on the basis of its distribution over the body, its electrophysiological characteristics, and its etiology. Electrical recording techniques can often localize the source of myoclonus to the surface of the brain, deep brain structures, or the spinal cord."


 

Re: myoclonus--except that.... dj

Posted by Noa on March 6, 2001, at 14:25:13

In reply to Re: myoclonus, posted by dj on March 5, 2001, at 20:02:23

I think that as a side effect, it occurs when at rest and/or right before falling asleep, as opposed to when upright or trying to move. That has been my experience, anyway. And my myoclonus was not continuous, just random.

 

Re: myoclonus--except that....

Posted by danf on March 6, 2001, at 18:55:51

In reply to Re: myoclonus--except that.... dj, posted by Noa on March 6, 2001, at 14:25:13

myoclonus was coined as a term & defined before it was a common happening with widely used drugs.

it is common with SSRIs & some ADs & does not have the same severe neurological implications.

I have had it for a couple of yrs now & it is kind of like an ole friend....

& I repeat the chant... Mg++, Vit E, Beta Blocker... & curse the worms that gave me this disease...

 

Re: myoclonus--twitches.... Noa

Posted by dj on March 7, 2001, at 0:15:27

In reply to Re: myoclonus--except that.... dj, posted by Noa on March 6, 2001, at 14:25:13

> I think that as a side effect, it occurs when at rest and/or right before falling asleep, as opposed to when upright or trying to move. That has been my experience, anyway. And my myoclonus >was not continuous, just random.

Any twitching of eylids? That's one I recall at various times and some leg twitching too...

Briefly had a roomate once who would twich wildly in his sleep in the bunkbed beneath mine at the ski resort we both then worked at... At which time I would wake and pound him with my pillow until he awoke and ceased. One night he got wise, caught me by suprise and tossed my pillow out the window into a snowdrift three stories below....


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