Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 45475

Shown: posts 1 to 9 of 9. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

seroquel

Posted by Joy Robins on September 29, 2000, at 16:05:26

I'm taking 100mg. seroquel at night for anxiety and depression. I am feeling extremely tired during the day--I don't feel like doing anything. I take a nap and I still feel tired. I am still bombarded with negative thoughts and this lack of energy makes it difficult to shift from negative to positive thinking. I've been on the meds about 1 week. Started with 25 mg. and worked up gradually to 100mg--the dose I've been at for the last 4 nights. Will this tiredness go away eventually? The med has reduced my anxiety some, but I still feel very depressed--how long does it take for its antidepressant properties to work? Any feedback would be appreciated. I feel like I'm going through hell--I've been either very depressed or anxious for about a year now. I was on Welbutrin and Lithium before this---Lithium Knocked me out to--but the welbutrin counteracted that some--I think I was doing somewhat better on that combo, than on this. I tend to react very strongly to everything so my dr. is trying to be careful about what she puts me on. I'm having trouble getting any work done, because I feel so depressed.

 

Re: seroquel

Posted by tina on September 29, 2000, at 22:12:42

In reply to seroquel, posted by Joy Robins on September 29, 2000, at 16:05:26

Seroquel is an anti-psychotic. I am wondering why your doc has given it to you for depression. Have you been diagnosed with schizphrenia or bipolar? Just wondering.
I haven't taken it but I read about it and know someone for whom it has done wonders. I hope it helps you soon but if the wellbutrin worked, why did your doc take you off it??
I know, I'm not helping but I just was curious about why you're on it. Twll me to mind my own business if you like.
I do hope you feel better soon though.
Hugs
Tina

> I'm taking 100mg. seroquel at night for anxiety and depression. I am feeling extremely tired during the day--I don't feel like doing anything. I take a nap and I still feel tired. I am still bombarded with negative thoughts and this lack of energy makes it difficult to shift from negative to positive thinking. I've been on the meds about 1 week. Started with 25 mg. and worked up gradually to 100mg--the dose I've been at for the last 4 nights. Will this tiredness go away eventually? The med has reduced my anxiety some, but I still feel very depressed--how long does it take for its antidepressant properties to work? Any feedback would be appreciated. I feel like I'm going through hell--I've been either very depressed or anxious for about a year now. I was on Welbutrin and Lithium before this---Lithium Knocked me out to--but the welbutrin counteracted that some--I think I was doing somewhat better on that combo, than on this. I tend to react very strongly to everything so my dr. is trying to be careful about what she puts me on. I'm having trouble getting any work done, because I feel so depressed.

 

Re: seroquel

Posted by Cindy W on September 29, 2000, at 22:52:54

In reply to Re: seroquel, posted by tina on September 29, 2000, at 22:12:42

> Seroquel is an anti-psychotic. I am wondering why your doc has given it to you for depression. Have you been diagnosed with schizphrenia or bipolar? Just wondering.
> I haven't taken it but I read about it and know someone for whom it has done wonders. I hope it helps you soon but if the wellbutrin worked, why did your doc take you off it??
> I know, I'm not helping but I just was curious about why you're on it. Twll me to mind my own business if you like.
> I do hope you feel better soon though.
> Hugs
> Tina
>
> > I'm taking 100mg. seroquel at night for anxiety and depression. I am feeling extremely tired during the day--I don't feel like doing anything. I take a nap and I still feel tired. I am still bombarded with negative thoughts and this lack of energy makes it difficult to shift from negative to positive thinking. I've been on the meds about 1 week. Started with 25 mg. and worked up gradually to 100mg--the dose I've been at for the last 4 nights. Will this tiredness go away eventually? The med has reduced my anxiety some, but I still feel very depressed--how long does it take for its antidepressant properties to work? Any feedback would be appreciated. I feel like I'm going through hell--I've been either very depressed or anxious for about a year now. I was on Welbutrin and Lithium before this---Lithium Knocked me out to--but the welbutrin counteracted that some--I think I was doing somewhat better on that combo, than on this. I tend to react very strongly to everything so my dr. is trying to be careful about what she puts me on. I'm having trouble getting any work done, because I feel so depressed.

Joy and Tina, I've recently started taking Seroquel also; my pdoc said it is to decrease anxiety and sleep, and I've read that it is used as an anti-anxiety medication at low to moderate doses. It is apparently antipsychotic at much higher doses. I started at 25 mg/night, then 50 mg/night, and now am taking l00 mg/night. I had to call in sick for work today, because I just couldn't wake up. I slept over l8 hours in the past 24. Supposedly, however, the oversedation and fatigue will decrease. I felt the same way on 25 and 50 mg, and the tiredness went away. Am hoping I can get more energy soon, since I can't just let my job and my life go much longer! Am also on Effexor-XR 375 mg/day, Entex (decongestant), and Serzone l50 mg/day. At least I'm sleeping well and my dreams are back, which I like!--Cindy W

 

Re: seroquel Joy Robins

Posted by shellie on September 29, 2000, at 23:28:34

In reply to seroquel, posted by Joy Robins on September 29, 2000, at 16:05:26


Since using seroquel for schizophrenia relieved depression in that group, it is now often proscribed as an adjunct to an anti-depressant. Joy, I don't really know why it would be described for you on its own as an AD, since there haven't been much data out on that use. My last pdoc also prescribed seroquel for me, which prompted a fax from me concerning the need to determine in my trials both the percentages of success and possible time lost. I didn't want to give up a lot of time for a low percentage chance. (I consider sleeping all the time a time loss). Then I went for a consultation with someone else this week who thought antipsychotics for ME had been a bad choice.

I would ask your doctor why she specifically chose that drug and I would also ask how long your trial should be. Additionally I would, if I were you, ask what other possiblities she has in mind, based on your previous medication success/failure and the type of depression that you have. I think when working with a doctor, we need to continue to advocate for ourselves, to keep our doctors on the best track for us. I didn't have the feeling with my last pdoc towards the end (maybe it was both our desperation) that her choices were both well thought out in terms of high chance of success and predicted length of time lost (sleeping all the time is time lost to me). So I set up a consultation with another pdoc for a sense of freshness-- armed with documentation of the eleven meds I had done trials of (as an adjunct) since last February. Trials lasting from one day to three weeks. And I got a totally different approach. But, of course, no matter how clear the theory, the jury will be out till I see if it works and how he works. But really, you should be asking your pdoc as many questions as you can think of. Shellie

 

Re: seroquel

Posted by Cindy W on September 30, 2000, at 22:17:42

In reply to Re: seroquel Joy Robins, posted by shellie on September 29, 2000, at 23:28:34

>
> Since using seroquel for schizophrenia relieved depression in that group, it is now often proscribed as an adjunct to an anti-depressant. Joy, I don't really know why it would be described for you on its own as an AD, since there haven't been much data out on that use. My last pdoc also prescribed seroquel for me, which prompted a fax from me concerning the need to determine in my trials both the percentages of success and possible time lost. I didn't want to give up a lot of time for a low percentage chance. (I consider sleeping all the time a time loss). Then I went for a consultation with someone else this week who thought antipsychotics for ME had been a bad choice.
>
> I would ask your doctor why she specifically chose that drug and I would also ask how long your trial should be. Additionally I would, if I were you, ask what other possiblities she has in mind, based on your previous medication success/failure and the type of depression that you have. I think when working with a doctor, we need to continue to advocate for ourselves, to keep our doctors on the best track for us. I didn't have the feeling with my last pdoc towards the end (maybe it was both our desperation) that her choices were both well thought out in terms of high chance of success and predicted length of time lost (sleeping all the time is time lost to me). So I set up a consultation with another pdoc for a sense of freshness-- armed with documentation of the eleven meds I had done trials of (as an adjunct) since last February. Trials lasting from one day to three weeks. And I got a totally different approach. But, of course, no matter how clear the theory, the jury will be out till I see if it works and how he works. But really, you should be asking your pdoc as many questions as you can think of. Shellie

Shellie, I agree with your notion of time loss, from sleeping! On Seroquel l00 mg/day, I slept 28 hours out of the past 48, which seems like a bit too much, to me. I was so tired on Friday, I couldn't get out of bed and go to work. Can't get a pdoc appt. until Oct. 23, but may decrease the Seroquel dosage in the interim if I can't function. I do feel my thinking is clearer...and I slept MUCH better...just too much.--Cindy W

 

Re: seroquel

Posted by SLS on September 30, 2000, at 22:43:03

In reply to Re: seroquel, posted by Cindy W on September 30, 2000, at 22:17:42

> >
> > Since using seroquel for schizophrenia relieved depression in that group, it is now often proscribed as an adjunct to an anti-depressant. Joy, I don't really know why it would be described for you on its own as an AD, since there haven't been much data out on that use. My last pdoc also prescribed seroquel for me, which prompted a fax from me concerning the need to determine in my trials both the percentages of success and possible time lost. I didn't want to give up a lot of time for a low percentage chance. (I consider sleeping all the time a time loss). Then I went for a consultation with someone else this week who thought antipsychotics for ME had been a bad choice.
> >
> > I would ask your doctor why she specifically chose that drug and I would also ask how long your trial should be. Additionally I would, if I were you, ask what other possiblities she has in mind, based on your previous medication success/failure and the type of depression that you have. I think when working with a doctor, we need to continue to advocate for ourselves, to keep our doctors on the best track for us. I didn't have the feeling with my last pdoc towards the end (maybe it was both our desperation) that her choices were both well thought out in terms of high chance of success and predicted length of time lost (sleeping all the time is time lost to me). So I set up a consultation with another pdoc for a sense of freshness-- armed with documentation of the eleven meds I had done trials of (as an adjunct) since last February. Trials lasting from one day to three weeks. And I got a totally different approach. But, of course, no matter how clear the theory, the jury will be out till I see if it works and how he works. But really, you should be asking your pdoc as many questions as you can think of. Shellie
>
> Shellie, I agree with your notion of time loss, from sleeping! On Seroquel l00 mg/day, I slept 28 hours out of the past 48, which seems like a bit too much, to me. I was so tired on Friday, I couldn't get out of bed and go to work. Can't get a pdoc appt. until Oct. 23, but may decrease the Seroquel dosage in the interim if I can't function. I do feel my thinking is clearer...and I slept MUCH better...just too much.--Cindy W

I think Zyprexa is generally a more effective adjunct to traditional antidepressants than is Seroquel. Whatever sedation Zyprexa produces seems to disappear quickly - within a few days.

If Seroquel has made you think more clearly, I think you should try Zyprexa if the Seroquel doesn't work out. Zyprexa + SSRI or Zyprexa + Nardil are probably good combinations.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Re: seroquel SLS

Posted by shellie on September 30, 2000, at 22:57:14

In reply to Re: seroquel, posted by SLS on September 30, 2000, at 22:43:03

> I think Zyprexa is generally a more effective adjunct to traditional antidepressants than is Seroquel. Whatever sedation Zyprexa produces seems to disappear quickly - within a few days.
>
> If Seroquel has made you think more clearly, I think you should try Zyprexa if the Seroquel doesn't work out. Zyprexa + SSRI or Zyprexa + Nardil are probably good combinations.


Scott,
The problem with zyprexa is the almost certain weight gain, which for some of us, would neutralize any uplifting effects. Shellie

 

Re: seroquel

Posted by SLS on October 1, 2000, at 0:34:06

In reply to Re: seroquel SLS, posted by shellie on September 30, 2000, at 22:57:14

> Scott,
> The problem with zyprexa is the almost certain weight gain, which for some of us, would neutralize any uplifting effects. Shellie


I know. I am vain and gain weight on Zyprexa. I think this side effect helped to allow me to exceed to my doctor's request that I try Risperdal, even though I just don't like that drug. The doctor asked me if I would just give Risperdal a try. He cited several published articles detailing its successful use as an adjunct to antidepressants. I replied "well, what about Zyprexa?" He said, "You could do that. I have no problem with that." I told him that I used Zyprexa to combat a Nardil-discontinuation-induced mania for a few weeks. I liked the way I felt on it for the first week. Then it began to fade. I remember remarking to someone that it definitely allowed me to think more clearly. I also told him that I had once taken Risperdal for a Parnate-induced mania. I felt depressed after the first dose. Not like Zyprexa.

I want to foster a healthy and trusting relationship with my new doctor. I want allow the doctor to get me well the best way he knows how. He knows more than me. I don't want to get in his (my own) way.

I said, "I don't want to choose Zyprexa and then be wrong." He then asked me, "Do you want me to decide?" I said, "Yes." He then uttered the word "Risperdal" with a smile.

Even though Risperdal did not turn out to be the right drug for me, allowing him to make this treatment decision is the best thing that could have happened to me. It helps break an old habit.


- Scott


P.S. Go to bed! I'll blame you if I get no sleep tonight should you reply immediately to this post. Midnight babble tennis!

 

Re: seroquel shellie

Posted by SLS on October 1, 2000, at 0:37:27

In reply to Re: seroquel SLS, posted by shellie on September 30, 2000, at 22:57:14

> P.S. Go to bed! I'll blame you if I get no sleep tonight should you reply immediately to this post. Midnight babble tennis.

Shellie, don't even think about it.


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