Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 45447

Shown: posts 1 to 11 of 11. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa

Posted by Sandy J on September 28, 2000, at 21:20:18

My husband has been taking Celexa for over a year now. His dosage has been increased and I have noticed a HUGE increase in memory problems, i.e. he can't remember entire conversations,to everday tasks such as thinking he has paid bills when he hasn't. Has anyone else experienced this or know of someone who has. He is now taking 40 mg a day. Thanks for any and all input.

 

Re: Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa

Posted by pullmarine on September 29, 2000, at 12:34:28

In reply to Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa, posted by Sandy J on September 28, 2000, at 21:20:18

Yup, sounds familiar to me. That's why I kept quitting taking them when i had to study for my exams. Unfortunatly, there's no magic pill out there (I should know, i've tried a whole bunch of the, and more). they all have some side effect or another. they all alter brain chemistry, and no one really knows what the long term effects of these drugs are.

John

> My husband has been taking Celexa for over a year now. His dosage has been increased and I have noticed a HUGE increase in memory problems, i.e. he can't remember entire conversations,to everday tasks such as thinking he has paid bills when he hasn't. Has anyone else experienced this or know of someone who has. He is now taking 40 mg a day. Thanks for any and all input.

 

Re: Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa

Posted by stjames on September 29, 2000, at 13:17:16

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa, posted by pullmarine on September 29, 2000, at 12:34:28

> Yup, sounds familiar to me. That's why I kept quitting taking them when i had to study for my exams. Unfortunatly, there's no magic pill out there (I should know, i've tried a whole bunch of the, and more). they all have some side effect or another. they all alter brain chemistry, and no one really knows what the long term effects of these drugs are.
>

James here....

How long is long term ? People have been on AD's for 50 yrs.

james

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james)

Posted by jane on September 29, 2000, at 20:40:36

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa, posted by stjames on September 29, 2000, at 13:17:16

Memory problems? I can't remember what I'm supposed to remember which is a blessing because then life doesn't seem so bad.
james-
on memory problems-you gave me info on seizures and I thought that I would update you.
I switch from ambien to halicon and I'm not sure that I sleep any better (still waiting to see if there is a difference in muscle spasms) BUT my memory is better. And that is exciting. I can actually remember this morning !! Yesterday and last week are questionable but at least I remember TODAY! thanks again-jane

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james) jane

Posted by SLS on September 29, 2000, at 21:30:10

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james), posted by jane on September 29, 2000, at 20:40:36

> Memory problems? I can't remember what I'm supposed to remember which is a blessing because then life doesn't seem so bad.
> james-
> on memory problems-you gave me info on seizures and I thought that I would update you.
> I switch from ambien to halicon and I'm not sure that I sleep any better (still waiting to see if there is a difference in muscle spasms) BUT my memory is better. And that is exciting. I can actually remember this morning !! Yesterday and last week are questionable but at least I remember TODAY! thanks again-jane


Just a few thoughts...

Both Ambien (zolpidem) and Halcion (triazolam) are extremely short-acting, yet powerful hypnotics. They are like getting hit over the head once with a baseball bat. They put you down very quickly and definitively. However, there is nothing to prevent you from getting up again because nothing is holding you down. You may need to use something that is longer acting, like Ativan (lorazepam) or Restoril (temazepam). An effective strategy is to take both Halcion and Ativan. The Halcion knocks you down and the Ativan holds you down.

Interestingly, it is amnesia that has been one of the most damaging complaints directed at Halcion. But I have seen many people complain about Ambien as well.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Re: Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa Sandy J

Posted by Kath on September 30, 2000, at 8:52:35

In reply to Any Memory Problems Associated with Taking Celexa, posted by Sandy J on September 28, 2000, at 21:20:18

Hi Sandy - See my post above (28th)

Kath

> My husband has been taking Celexa for over a year now. His dosage has been increased and I have noticed a HUGE increase in memory problems, i.e. he can't remember entire conversations,to everday tasks such as thinking he has paid bills when he hasn't. Has anyone else experienced this or know of someone who has. He is now taking 40 mg a day. Thanks for any and all input.

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james)

Posted by jane on October 1, 2000, at 20:37:24

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james) jane, posted by SLS on September 29, 2000, at 21:30:10

> Both Ambien (zolpidem) and Halcion (triazolam) are extremely short-acting, yet powerful hypnotics. They are like getting hit over the head once with a baseball bat. They put you down very quickly and definitively. However, there is nothing to prevent you from getting up again because nothing is holding you down. You may need to use something that is longer acting, like Ativan (lorazepam) or Restoril (temazepam). An effective strategy is to take both Halcion and Ativan. The Halcion knocks you down and the Ativan holds you down.
>
> Interestingly, it is amnesia that has been one of the most damaging complaints directed at Halcion. But I have seen many people complain about Ambien as well.
>
> Good luck.
>
>
> - Scott

Scott- I tried temazepam before halicaon but it kept me up all night being very nauseous.
With halicon (or ambien) it still takes 3-5 hours to get to sleep by 2-3AM. I did have a very scary event on ambien of leaving the house and driving to the store at midnight. I didn't remember anything but my teenage son was frightened. Obviously I'm "grounded" at night and now I'm halicon, 0.25mg., with 25mg elavil and ultram at night but that combo doesn't "put" me to sleep or keep me asleep. Right now I'm just feel better that I can remember today on halicon; I couldn't remember this morning on ambien (interestingly I've taken as much as 40mg ambien and not been able to sleep)I haven't tried the ativan mix; that may be next but right now I just want to settle in on this drug-mix.
thanks-jane

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james) jane

Posted by SLS on October 2, 2000, at 9:54:40

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james), posted by jane on October 1, 2000, at 20:37:24

Dear Jane,

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.

> > Both Ambien (zolpidem) and Halcion (triazolam) are extremely short-acting, yet powerful hypnotics. They are like getting hit over the head once with a baseball bat. They put you down very quickly and definitively. However, there is nothing to prevent you from getting up again because nothing is holding you down. You may need to use something that is longer acting, like Ativan (lorazepam) or Restoril (temazepam). An effective strategy is to take both Halcion and Ativan. The Halcion knocks you down and the Ativan holds you down.
> >
> > Interestingly, it is amnesia that has been one of the most damaging complaints directed at Halcion. But I have seen many people complain about Ambien as well.
> >
> > Good luck.
> >
> >
> > - Scott
>
> Scott- I tried temazepam before halicaon but it kept me up all night being very nauseous.
> With halicon (or ambien) it still takes 3-5 hours to get to sleep by 2-3AM. I did have a very scary event on ambien of leaving the house and driving to the store at midnight. I didn't remember anything but my teenage son was frightened. Obviously I'm "grounded" at night and now I'm halicon, 0.25mg., with 25mg elavil and ultram at night but that combo doesn't "put" me to sleep or keep me asleep. Right now I'm just feel better that I can remember today on halicon; I couldn't remember this morning on ambien (interestingly I've taken as much as 40mg ambien and not been able to sleep)I haven't tried the ativan mix; that may be next but right now I just want to settle in on this drug-mix.
> thanks-jane

Try 1.0mg of Halcion + Ativan. You will fall asleep in less than 5 hours. I guarantee it. Well, no. I can't guarantee it, but I bet you do.

Just because Ambien affects your memory does not guarantee that Halcion will, even at high dosages. Halcion used to be available in 0.5mg tablets so that it would not be too inconvenient to take a couple of grams. Upjohn decided to cut their numbers in half in an effort to avoid a media blitz against Halcion for the sorts of things you describe. I think Ambien may even be worse.

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.

I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.


- Scott

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - SLS :-))))

Posted by jane on October 2, 2000, at 19:47:52

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems - (st.james) jane, posted by SLS on October 2, 2000, at 9:54:40

> I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.
>
> I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.
>
> I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.
>
> I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.
>
> I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.
>
> I found 1.0mg of Halcion (triazolam) to work well, and I never had the slightest problem with memory.
>
>
> - Scott

SCOTT - I love it, you cracked me up and the laughs are to few. Since getting to sleep seems to be a problem, would you try increasing the halcion or adding ativan first?
jane

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - SLS :-)))) jane

Posted by SLS on October 2, 2000, at 22:12:33

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems - SLS :-)))), posted by jane on October 2, 2000, at 19:47:52

> Since getting to sleep seems to be a problem, would you try increasing the halcion or adding ativan first?

Dear Jane,

You can certainly try the Halcion by itself first. I wouldn't waste my time with anything less than 0.5mg.

Regardless of which aspect of sleep is most problematic, you may need to use both.

Halcion is the most potent of the benzodiazepine sleeping pills. It is also the one with the shortest half-life, about 3 hours. This means that it disappears from the blood stream very rapidly. The consequences of this are not merely that it wears of quickly, but it can allow for "rebound-awakenings". Imagine yourself lying on a trampoline, staring at the third star in Orion's belt, waiting to fall asleep. The Halcion puts you to sleep. It pushes you deep down into the trampoline. Then, it suddenly vanishes and you are released. You go flying up into the air, higher and more awake than when first took the Halcion. This is not a problem if, after the Halcion has worked to push you down, another drug is there to keep you down once the Halcion disappears. This is where Ativan comes in. The half-life of Ativan is approximately 12 to 15 hours. It will keep you down (asleep) the rest of the way through the night and allow you to awaken more smoothly.

Of course, some trial-and-error might be necessary to find the optimum dosages of each drug and when best to take them. For instance, if you wake up too groggy, you may try to reduce the dosage of Ativan. If, at the reduced dosage, it no longer keeps you asleep, you can try to take it earlier in the evening and wait until you go to bed to take the Halcion.

I like the Halcion-Ativan combination. I found these drugs to be very "clean". I didn't ever feel drugged or sedated. Just calmer and sleepier. It's not like Xanax. I have used this combination successfully in the past to treat total sleep deprivation produced by several different drugs. Parnate is one.

I took 1.0mg of Halcion and 2.0mg of Ativan.

You won't know if amnesia or other cognitive effects will occur until you try them. I have seen at least one case in which Ambien produced amnesia whereas Halcion did not. Be the second.

Good luck.


- Scott

 

Re: Any Memory Problems - SLS

Posted by jane on October 3, 2000, at 23:02:59

In reply to Re: Any Memory Problems - SLS :-)))) jane, posted by SLS on October 2, 2000, at 22:12:33

SCOTT-
Thanks, I'll print off your info, and try it.
I have to wait two more weeks to change drug combo and/or amount because I'm in a research study (not about mental health, thank god).
What you said about halicon's rebound makes alot of sense because I used to take .50mg years ago, and with that I would get two hours of sleep,maybe. Then I was wound all day, but I also was in alot of stress.
I definitely have a few more brain cells available on halicon than on ambien. Knowing that I "toured" the city at midnight on ambien and have no memory of the "outing" REALLY scared me. Just glad I wore some pajamas.
I'll let you know what happens. thanks -much-
jane


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