Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1112581

Shown: posts 1 to 15 of 15. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties

Posted by Skeletor on November 16, 2020, at 13:27:36

Strong 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties. It also shouldn't be a strong antihistamine, so no Mirtazapine, Miansern etc.! Is there something like that on the market?

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties Skeletor

Posted by jay2112 on November 16, 2020, at 17:49:53

In reply to 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by Skeletor on November 16, 2020, at 13:27:36

> Strong 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties. It also shouldn't be a strong antihistamine, so no Mirtazapine, Miansern etc.! Is there something like that on the market?
>
>

Well, I found mirtazapine to have way, way too powerful norepinephrine agonist properties as well. Maybe, your closest bet would be an antipsychotic. Risperdal has very powerful 5ht2a antagonist properties. If you are in the US, the antidepressant Nefadazone (Generic Serzone) I found, is an amazing, very tolerable, 5ht2a antagonist. It *really* has a relaxing effect, without making you sleepy.

Jay

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties

Posted by undopaminergic on November 17, 2020, at 0:11:04

In reply to 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by Skeletor on November 16, 2020, at 13:27:36

> Strong 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties. It also shouldn't be a strong antihistamine, so no Mirtazapine, Miansern etc.! Is there something like that on the market?
>

Maybe lurasidone (Latuda). It has some other interesting properties as well.

However, anticholinergic properties can be therapeutic.

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Pimavanserin

Posted by linkadge on November 17, 2020, at 12:50:13

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by undopaminergic on November 17, 2020, at 0:11:04

Pimavanserin is probably the cleanest 5-ht2a antagonist. Being approved only for Parkinson's related psychosis, however, it could be difficult to obtain.

Linkadge

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties undopaminergic

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:04:57

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by undopaminergic on November 17, 2020, at 0:11:04

> > Strong 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties. It also shouldn't be a strong antihistamine, so no Mirtazapine, Miansern etc.! Is there something like that on the market?
> >
>
> Maybe lurasidone (Latuda). It has some other interesting properties as well.
>
> However, anticholinergic properties can be therapeutic.
>
> -undopaminergic
>

Yeah, I've been looking into atypical antipsychotics...

Aripiprazole is also quite interesting.

I am not against anticholinergics per se, but it seems that I show some sort of dental reaction to them. I will make photos and show them to you. Anticholinergic drugs are f*ck*ng up my enamel...

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties jay2112

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:07:41

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties Skeletor, posted by jay2112 on November 16, 2020, at 17:49:53

> > Strong 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties. It also shouldn't be a strong antihistamine, so no Mirtazapine, Miansern etc.! Is there something like that on the market?
> >
> >
>
> Well, I found mirtazapine to have way, way too powerful norepinephrine agonist properties as well. Maybe, your closest bet would be an antipsychotic. Risperdal has very powerful 5ht2a antagonist properties. If you are in the US, the antidepressant Nefadazone (Generic Serzone) I found, is an amazing, very tolerable, 5ht2a antagonist. It *really* has a relaxing effect, without making you sleepy.
>
> Jay
>

Thanks. I would have like to try Mirtazapine for longer times, but it gave me unbearable RLS...

NEFAZDONE is a great drug, but not available in EUROPE. Banned because one in every 300,000 gets an exploding liver or something... :=((

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:11:08

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties jay2112, posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:07:41

This is kinda interesting: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deramciclane
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

What is your take on Amoxapine?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amoxapine
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

For Pizotifen I get the following values from Ki Database https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pizotifen

5HT1A... 200 - 1700 nM

5HT2A... 15.5 nM

5HT2C... 5 - 8 nM

I didn't find values for H1 and muscarinic receptors
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritanserin

Also quite strong at 5HT2
Then there is also stuff like Ketanserin, Pimavanserin etc.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nefazodone

Pretty perfect drug ^^

Never understood its ban.

 

Re: Pimavanserin linkadge

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:14:05

In reply to Re: Pimavanserin, posted by linkadge on November 17, 2020, at 12:50:13

> Pimavanserin is probably the cleanest 5-ht2a antagonist. Being approved only for Parkinson's related psychosis, however, it could be difficult to obtain.
>
> Linkadge
>
>

Interesting! But seems unavailable in Germany.

Let's see what my grey-market-pharmacy (EU-Ailbolit) offers... no luck. :=((

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:57:51

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by undopaminergic on November 17, 2020, at 0:11:04

I would like to continue my Nortriptyline trial, BUT it seems that I am showing some sort of dental reaction to it. Not sure if it's NORTRITYPLINE and if so, whether it's the anticholinergic properties or some other intrinsic property of Nortriptyline. I will make photos and show them to you. Something seems to f*ck*ng up my enamel and I suspect NORT... also my other teeth start to show signs or problems (pain sensitivity, small darkish dots). It's a shame, because NORT is an interesting drug, but I cannot let my teeth go to waste O_O

I have an appointment at university hospital @ DENTIST / DENTAL SPECIALIST to check that sh*t out. It concerns me greatly!

That's why I am thinking about alternatives ;=)

 

new side effect.

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 16:26:57

In reply to 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by Skeletor on November 16, 2020, at 13:27:36

new side effect... some "numb" tingling of my face and jaw. A paraesthetic feeling.

 

Re: new side effect. Skeletor

Posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 16:30:29

In reply to new side effect., posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 16:26:57

> new side effect... some "numb" tingling of my face and jaw. A paraesthetic feeling.

Also throat pain and sore throat since starting Nortriptyline.

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties

Posted by undopaminergic on November 18, 2020, at 7:59:21

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by Skeletor on November 17, 2020, at 15:11:08

>
> What is your take on Amoxapine?
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amoxapine

I don't know if I got the details right, but what comes to mind is that it has some things in common with trimipramine (D2 receptor antagonism) and more typical TCAs like imipramine (serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition).

> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritanserin
>
> Also quite strong at 5HT2

Should be -- namely, it is the "standard" 5-HT2 antagonist used in research.

-undopaminergic

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties undopaminergic

Posted by Skeletor on December 12, 2020, at 9:31:09

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by undopaminergic on November 18, 2020, at 7:59:21

> Should be -- namely, it is the "standard" 5-HT2 antagonist used in research.
>
> -undopaminergic
>

Good to know ;=)

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties

Posted by SLS on December 14, 2020, at 11:54:06

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by undopaminergic on November 17, 2020, at 0:11:04

> > Strong 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties. It also shouldn't be a strong antihistamine, so no Mirtazapine, Miansern etc.! Is there something like that on the market?
> >
>
> Maybe lurasidone (Latuda). It has some other interesting properties as well.
>
> However, anticholinergic properties can be therapeutic.
>
> -undopaminergic
>


Chronic use of anticholinergics is thought to cause Alzheimer's Dementia. One thing I know for sure, anticholinergics can make Alzheimer's Dementia significantly worse.


- Scott

 

Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties SLS

Posted by undopaminergic on December 15, 2020, at 2:12:16

In reply to Re: 5HT2 antagonist without anticholinergic properties, posted by SLS on December 14, 2020, at 11:54:06

>
> Chronic use of anticholinergics is thought to cause Alzheimer's Dementia.

I hadn't heard that one before.

> One thing I know for sure, anticholinergics can make Alzheimer's Dementia significantly worse.
>

Anticholinergics have cognitive side effects, not just in Alzheimer's. I never noticed it but maybe that's because I am hypercholinergic.

-undopaminergic


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