Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1111083

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diazepam duration and treatment

Posted by rjlockhart37 on June 30, 2020, at 13:39:26

i've been taking it for a while, firs they say its long acting, which it does its half life is 200 hours. But im saying when i take half tablet or 5mg tablet, it only lasts for exactly 7 hours. Then i can feel it worn off, and anxiety comes back. It's not so much effective for panic attacks, you would have to take 20mg to calm down from panic attack. And plus 20mg diazepam is equal to about 2mg of alrazolam, not in doses, but potency. You see people taking 2mg bars and getting intoxicated, or very relief. This does, but it doenst bring that level of relief and almost a high, or antidepressant feeling from xanax. US, xanax is the most prescribed benzodiapine, most doctors use. And, for one reason, th eamont of relief it brings, lorazepam is 2nd, clonazepam is potent but it feels like phenobarbital calm, not euphoric kinda sedating and depressing, at higher doses.

To feel absolute relief, usally 15mg is the dose to take. I take the 5mg, yea it does bring a calm, but nothing alprazoaln,

 

Re: diazepam duration and treatment

Posted by rjlockhart37 on July 7, 2020, at 17:09:44

In reply to diazepam duration and treatment, posted by rjlockhart37 on June 30, 2020, at 13:39:26

diazepam is not long acting, i don't know why the hell these people say its long acting, and has metabolites like temazepam and a few others, its 5pm and only worked for 7 hours. Now im anxiety again, feel irrtible. All this stuff with it saying it has half life of 200 hours, thats what inactive ones are, but the actual effect is 7-8 hours. Then you feel it wearing off. Bull-crap about long acting

 

Re: diazepam duration and treatment rjlockhart37

Posted by ed_uk2010 on July 10, 2020, at 15:19:17

In reply to Re: diazepam duration and treatment, posted by rjlockhart37 on July 7, 2020, at 17:09:44

Diazepam is often FAR less long-acting than claimed. This is because the half-life refers to elimination, not the duration of presence in the brain. Diazepam is extremely rapidly redistributed to fat in the body... so much of it may end up in the belly fat etc and not in the brain.

Nevertheless, it does accumulate with repeated dosing and the duration of action increases. In the elderly, it can potentially accumulate a great deal and end up lasting for ages.

 

Re: diazepam duration and treatment

Posted by rjlockhart37 on July 18, 2020, at 11:33:37

In reply to Re: diazepam duration and treatment rjlockhart37, posted by ed_uk2010 on July 10, 2020, at 15:19:17

diazepam is not potent, compared to the other blockbuster benzos. Like 15-20mg is adequatte to 2mg of alrazolam, and that dose is usally never used. I think the max dose for diazepam is 4 10mg daily 40mg. Most doctors today don't use diazepam, used back in previous periods. So i never thought i would ever take diazepam, but ended up did. It does have muscle relaxation properities, i have to say that....stronger than others. But anxeity wise, its more general, ativan is severe anxiety, apraozolam is for panic attacsk and severe anxiety. It has antidepressant effects, so thats why people like alpraolam.

 

Re: diazepam duration and treatment

Posted by rjlockhart37 on July 18, 2020, at 11:42:38

In reply to Re: diazepam duration and treatment, posted by rjlockhart37 on July 18, 2020, at 11:33:37

lorazepam is more addictive than diazepam. It's more potent, and more anixety relief. Used to sedate out of control patients. I don't really like diazepam, but i don't have a choice right now. It does bring anxiety relief, i can the tension suddenly ease up, and go back to a calner state. Other ones, are more sedative like


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