Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1109958

Shown: posts 1 to 10 of 10. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Escitalopram vs Sertraline

Posted by Skeletor on May 4, 2020, at 8:19:38

Both are second-generation SSRIs, both exhibit minimal drug interactions via Cytochrome P450, both are the most prescribed SSRIs and are considered first line antidepressants. Who's been taking both and what were your experiences? (How did they compare to each other?). I am looking forward to read your experiences...

Which one did you like more?

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline

Posted by undopaminergic on May 4, 2020, at 10:56:05

In reply to Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by Skeletor on May 4, 2020, at 8:19:38

> Both are second-generation SSRIs, both exhibit minimal drug interactions via Cytochrome P450, both are the most prescribed SSRIs and are considered first line antidepressants. Who's been taking both and what were your experiences? (How did they compare to each other?). I am looking forward to read your experiences...
>
> Which one did you like more?

Sertraline seemed most potent, but not per mg. Thus it had stronger adverse effects, including apathy and prolonging time to orgasm. I did alas not notice its dopaminergic effects at higher doses.

So if you think you benefit from stronger serotonergic effects, go for sertraline.

Somewhat interestingly, I found that it reduces the risk of suicide because it makes you apathetic enough not to take action on your suicidal ideas. You're more likely to just stay in bed.

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline undopaminergic

Posted by Skeletor on May 4, 2020, at 17:46:12

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by undopaminergic on May 4, 2020, at 10:56:05

> > Both are second-generation SSRIs, both exhibit minimal drug interactions via Cytochrome P450, both are the most prescribed SSRIs and are considered first line antidepressants. Who's been taking both and what were your experiences? (How did they compare to each other?). I am looking forward to read your experiences...
> >
> > Which one did you like more?
>
> Sertraline seemed most potent, but not per mg. Thus it had stronger adverse effects, including apathy and prolonging time to orgasm. I did alas not notice its dopaminergic effects at higher doses.
>
> So if you think you benefit from stronger serotonergic effects, go for sertraline.
>
> Somewhat interestingly, I found that it reduces the risk of suicide because it makes you apathetic enough not to take action on your suicidal ideas. You're more likely to just stay in bed.
>
> -undopaminergic

I've been on Sertraline 50mg for two years. I liked that it abolished my physical symptoms of anxiety and depression (GI, gastritis, reflux, chest pains etc.). It also made me more outgoing and diminished my nervousness, probably due to the "indifference" it caused.

The indifference and apathy may be blessing and curse at the same time... because I did just lay in bed all time and stare at the wall. It make me a Zombie.

What I didn't like: lost weight on it, felt like I was overheating, got less stuff done than without it.

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline

Posted by rjlockhart37 on May 5, 2020, at 0:07:42

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline undopaminergic, posted by Skeletor on May 4, 2020, at 17:46:12

sertraline all i know, is good for severe depression. It even is better than Prozac in treating it. I've been on Prozac 80mg since 2005, i notice when i take it in the morning, im back to normal, im able to function. Before, in high school i constnatly was depressed, i would be in computer ops class looking up antidepressants online. Fluoxetine is less effective than serraline

All i know about lexepro, is it is a prodrug of celexa, i've read its better. But i have no idea how to compare it to zoloft. I was on zoloft for a short time, but not enough time to see any benefits.

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline

Posted by undopaminergic on May 5, 2020, at 2:21:56

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by rjlockhart37 on May 5, 2020, at 0:07:42

>
> All i know about lexepro, is it is a prodrug of celexa,

No it is not. It is one of the isomers of the racemic R,S-citalopram (Celexa), namely S-citalopram (Lexapro) alone, hence its chemical name (escitalopram as opposed to citalopram).

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline undopaminergic

Posted by Skeletor on May 5, 2020, at 7:29:01

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by undopaminergic on May 4, 2020, at 10:56:05

> > Both are second-generation SSRIs, both exhibit minimal drug interactions via Cytochrome P450, both are the most prescribed SSRIs and are considered first line antidepressants. Who's been taking both and what were your experiences? (How did they compare to each other?). I am looking forward to read your experiences...
> >
> > Which one did you like more?
>
> Sertraline seemed most potent, but not per mg. Thus it had stronger adverse effects, including apathy and prolonging time to orgasm. I did alas not notice its dopaminergic effects at higher doses.
>
> So if you think you benefit from stronger serotonergic effects, go for sertraline.
>
> Somewhat interestingly, I found that it reduces the risk of suicide because it makes you apathetic enough not to take action on your suicidal ideas. You're more likely to just stay in bed.
>
> -undopaminergic

Setraline itself felt like being on Speed or something. Dirty feeling.

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline rjlockhart37

Posted by Skeletor on May 5, 2020, at 15:26:14

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by rjlockhart37 on May 5, 2020, at 0:07:42

> sertraline all i know, is good for severe depression. It even is better than Prozac in treating it. I've been on Prozac 80mg since 2005, i notice when i take it in the morning, im back to normal, im able to function. Before, in high school i constnatly was depressed, i would be in computer ops class looking up antidepressants online. Fluoxetine is less effective than serraline
>
> All i know about lexepro, is it is a prodrug of celexa, i've read its better. But i have no idea how to compare it to zoloft. I was on zoloft for a short time, but not enough time to see any benefits.

The strange thing about Sertraline was that it gave me some stimulant energy, but it was a bad form of energy... an unpolished tough stimulant effect, like being on bad drugs or something. It didn't feel natural.

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline Skeletor

Posted by rjlockhart37 on May 5, 2020, at 18:44:30

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline rjlockhart37, posted by Skeletor on May 5, 2020, at 15:26:14

seratiline is a dopamine reptake inhibitor at higher doses, around 300-400mg. But i don't think thats why, it is good for more severe depression. It doenst exactly hit NE like fluoxetine does, but its more effective than fluoxetine.

Still zoloft has mixed reviews, many negative ones too.

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline

Posted by creepy on May 26, 2020, at 18:00:45

In reply to Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by Skeletor on May 4, 2020, at 8:19:38

sertraline was a better AD. The speculation about sertraline being a DRI at max dose I think its BS. I noticed no difference at all.
escitalopram was better for dealing with irritability at max dose. Unfortunately the carb cravings that came with that drug were like nothing I have ever taken.
Topiramate is your friend.

 

Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline

Posted by alchemy on June 22, 2020, at 20:33:45

In reply to Re: Escitalopram vs Sertraline, posted by creepy on May 26, 2020, at 18:00:45

> escitalopram was better for dealing with irritability at max dose. Unfortunately the carb cravings that came with that drug were like nothing I have ever taken.

Interesting! SSRIs cut down on my carb cravings. Amitriptyline made them skyrocket.


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