Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1108538

Shown: posts 1 to 12 of 12. This is the beginning of the thread.

 

Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:20:52

So it is in Phase III clinical trials as of this year and it has gotten fast-track designation. So that means it will probably hit the market in early 2021, provided that it proves effective and safe, right?

This would be a game changer for me. I am so scared of people.

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:22:12

In reply to Aloradine (again), posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:20:52

I think my Mother has caused this. She is an untreated 5150 sometimes. She raised me that way.

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:22:27

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:22:12

"raised"

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 10:07:44

In reply to Aloradine (again), posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:20:52

> So it is in Phase III clinical trials as of this year and it has gotten fast-track designation. So that means it will probably hit the market in early 2021, provided that it proves effective and safe, right?
>

Hopefully!

> This would be a game changer for me. I am so scared of people.

Are you also targeting this psychodynamically? It is more difficult (not as easy as taking a pill), but it is the only way to achieve lasting improvement. I have, but old habits die hard, so it's still not natural for me to take the first step in social interactions.

> I think my Mother has caused this. She is an untreated 5150 sometimes. She raised me that way.
>

What is 5150?

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Aloradine (again) Lamdage22

Posted by Jadde on February 19, 2020, at 10:27:03

In reply to Aloradine (again), posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 7:20:52

> So it is in Phase III clinical trials as of this year and it has gotten fast-track designation. So that means it will probably hit the market in early 2021, provided that it proves effective and safe, right?
>
> This would be a game changer for me. I am so scared of people.

I see that this is to be used 10-15 minutes prior to a social gathering of some kind ie public speaking etc. Does anyone know how long the effects last?

Jade

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 11:22:15

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 10:07:44

I am trying to. I finished a course of CBT-like therapy in October 2019. All the psychologists I have met said I should finish CBT first and see how I am doing after. I will call somebody tomorrow! There is an association for psychodynamic/analytic therapy for people prone to psychosis in my hometown. It would be best if I connect with somebody from that association to avoid becoming psychotic through the therapy. I think things need to be done a bit differently in people susceptible to psychosis.

Interesting. Can you tell me more about your experience?

5150 is the police code for a crazy person:)

> Are you also targeting this psychodynamically? It is more difficult (not as easy as taking a pill), but it is the only way to achieve lasting improvement. I have, but old habits die hard, so it's still not natural for me to take the first step in social interactions.

> What is 5150?
>
> -undopaminergic
>

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 11:25:42

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again) Lamdage22, posted by Jadde on February 19, 2020, at 10:27:03

Unfortunately, I don't. The first 20 minutes are the most important I think. If you can do this without freaking out, the ice is broken.


> I see that this is to be used 10-15 minutes prior to a social gathering of some kind ie public speaking etc. Does anyone know how long the effects last?
>
> Jade

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 13:42:58

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 11:22:15

> I am trying to. I finished a course of CBT-like therapy in October 2019. All the psychologists I have met said I should finish CBT first and see how I am doing after. I will call somebody tomorrow! There is an association for psychodynamic/analytic therapy for people prone to psychosis in my hometown. It would be best if I connect with somebody from that association to avoid becoming psychotic through the therapy. I think things need to be done a bit differently in people susceptible to psychosis.
>
> Interesting. Can you tell me more about your experience?
>

I'm not in a good shape to tell that story, due to apathy. Speaking of which, apathy is a serious problem for any kind of talk therapy, because the client has so little to say. Worse, in the context of analytic therapy, the apathetic analysand will have very few associations, making the technique of free association impossible.

While I do consider myself primarily oriented to the psychoanalytic school, I used the term "psychodynamic" as a counterpart to "pharmacodynamic".

But anyway, I can mention a few things I believe to be important.

I've been psychotic myself. It resembled paranoid schizophrenia, because I had the paranoid delusions and auditory hallucinations. However, in my mind, I have actually benefitted from that psychosis. It's not only that the experience has made me richer, but it has triggered psychological progress that has made me a whole other person, in comparison with before the psychosis.

I don't know the details of your psychoses, so I don't know what would be most relevant for you.

A practical tip for paranoid delusions, if you have that(?) is to gather facts, such as actually climb a ladder up to your loft and test your belief that there are people up there watching and manipulating you. I did this, and I could immediately and dismiss a number of extensive paranoid ideas.

If you think people can read your mind, you can put that belief to test, too, by thinking repeatedly about something, and see if you get any feedback at all from your surroundings to confirm or refute your belief. The more you do this, more more you can reassure yourself that your fears are unwarranted. I did this, and it's been one of the most effective "therapies" I've had, as least as far as psychosis is concerned.

Another trick is to come to terms with the scenario that your fears are true. Learn to live in the spotlight. Even if there are hidden cameras following your every move, that does not mean you have to stop living. Keep doing what you would do if no-one were watching. You will see that nothing bad happens, and you can further reassure and calm yourself, until, with time, you find yourself thinking less and less about it.

As for medications, I suggest you titrate the dose of antipsychotics to a level where you are on the borderline of psychosis. This is to allow natural psychological healing processes to work. If you medicate away the psychosis too completely, there is no opportunity for your mind to adapt, heal, and evolve. However, do not set the dose too low, as the symptoms can become too severe for the mind to learn to cope.

I find now that I'm immune to suffering the kind of psychotic breakdown I had, regardless of how little I sleep or how much stimulants I take. I have isolated delusions at times, but most of them help me more to feel better than the opposite. Indeed, I deliberately encourage "positive thinking"-kind of delusions, eg. "everything is possible" and "I have all the time in the world", "death is not the end, but is a new beginning".

I find that most of the delusions form at a time I am manic or otherwise feeling good. It takes time for the delusions to dissipate even after the mania is over, so mood stabilisation is perhaps the most important treatment modality for psychosis if you are bipolar.

Some of these approaches can be adapted to target social anxiety/phobia. Ask yourself: what is the worst adverse scenario you can imagine to result from a public speech? So what if all the audience are laughing at you? Indeed, you can take the laughter as proof that your speech was entertaining to your listeners. It's not going to happen, unless you say or do something very funny, like you're stand-up comedian.

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 13:50:06

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 13:42:58

Well, I did speak publically in school and everyone did laugh about me. Loudly. I was shaking of fear. They said i needed a cigarette. Ok, that was kind of funny but I didn't like the whole experience. However, I did not die.

So you benefitted from analytic therapy?

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 14:12:01

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 13:50:06

>
> So you benefitted from analytic therapy?

Nothing formal, but self-analytic exercises, such as writing essays.

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Aloradine (again)

Posted by Lamdage22 on February 19, 2020, at 14:25:30

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 13:42:58

Keeping the Neuroleptics low is maybe really a good idea. I notice that I am processing stuff when slightly paranoid.

 

Re: Aloradine (again) undopaminergic

Posted by Jadde on February 19, 2020, at 15:54:58

In reply to Re: Aloradine (again), posted by undopaminergic on February 19, 2020, at 13:42:58


> A practical tip for paranoid delusions, if you have that(?) is to gather facts, such as actually climb a ladder up to your loft and test your belief that there are people up there watching and manipulating you. I did this, and I could immediately and dismiss a number of extensive paranoid ideas.

Wow, this post in its entirety made my heart skip a beat. As for the ladder, I fell off it (extension) and broke my leg and smashed my knee. Brace for eight weeks. Never did find the ppl living in my attic.

My big take away after my recovery was this though: sick mind doesnt know its sick. In my case, it was absolutely true.

Thanks for the post, I feel slightly less horrified about that whole experience.

Jade


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