Psycho-Babble Medication Thread 1108435

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Brainwaves predict antidepressant response

Posted by beckett2 on February 10, 2020, at 23:57:02

Some of you may have heard this on NPR

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/02/10/804539572/will-that-antidepressant-work-for-you-the-answer-may-lie-in-your-brain-waves

Based on this study which only the abstract is available free.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41587-019-0397-3

 

Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response

Posted by Hugh on February 12, 2020, at 10:29:00

In reply to Brainwaves predict antidepressant response, posted by beckett2 on February 10, 2020, at 23:57:02

I hope this catches on. This would be so much better than the current trial and error method of treating depression.

 

Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response

Posted by SLS on February 14, 2020, at 20:11:12

In reply to Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response, posted by Hugh on February 12, 2020, at 10:29:00

> I hope this catches on. This would be so much better than the current trial and error method of treating depression.

This is good stuff. About 20 years ago, I proposed ideas like this, but I was laughed off the Usenet board. I had thought to start a clearinghouse of a select group of clinicians to keep detailed records of symptoms and treatment responses to drugs and compile a databases to see if their were any associations between symptom clusters and the drugs that best treated them. Then, I thought to develop a PET scan procedure to introduce a series of chemical agents to be used as biological probes and measure how they alter the activities of various brain structures and choose treatments based on the results. Perhaps fMRI would be worth using the same way. Obviously, EEG and other non-invasive tests would be more desirable, but desperate times call for desperate measures. More and more investigations are focusing on other types of biomarkers like measuring substances that serve as indices of inflammation.


- Scott

 

Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response

Posted by undopaminergic on February 15, 2020, at 3:08:41

In reply to Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response, posted by SLS on February 14, 2020, at 20:11:12

> > I hope this catches on. This would be so much better than the current trial and error method of treating depression.
>
> This is good stuff. About 20 years ago, I proposed ideas like this, but I was laughed off the Usenet board. I had thought to start a clearinghouse of a select group of clinicians to keep detailed records of symptoms and treatment responses to drugs and compile a databases to see if their were any associations between symptom clusters and the drugs that best treated them. Then, I thought to develop a PET scan procedure to introduce a series of chemical agents to be used as biological probes and measure how they alter the activities of various brain structures and choose treatments based on the results. Perhaps fMRI would be worth using the same way. Obviously, EEG and other non-invasive tests would be more desirable, but desperate times call for desperate measures. More and more investigations are focusing on other types of biomarkers like measuring substances that serve as indices of inflammation.
>
>
> - Scott

Good ideas,

-undopaminergic

 

Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response SLS

Posted by Hugh on February 16, 2020, at 23:39:34

In reply to Re: Brainwaves predict antidepressant response, posted by SLS on February 14, 2020, at 20:11:12

Scott, you were ahead of your time 20 years ago, and you're still ahead of your time. As Daniel Amen says, psychiatrists are the ONLY medical specialists who rarely look at the organ they treat.

I've had EEGs done, but they weren't ordered by a psychiatrist or any other medical doctor. I had EEGs thanks to neurofeedback.


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